All Stars Guest Post: Cissy’s Interview Tips

Hi readers! I relatively recently signed up to be part of Philofaxy’s All Stars 2013 Team, and here is the first guest post on this blog. Written by Cissy of The Contemplative Belle, it’s a fabulous little guide  to interviews. Check out my CV writing tips on this post here, and of course have a look at Cissy’s wonderfully eclectic blog!

 

All the studying, the budgeting, sitting through lecture after lecture that you thought would never end and finally you are at the light at the end of the tunnel. Your dream has come true and your college education is complete, diploma in hand. What’s next?

The job search is the next step and by this time you have probably gotten a lot of advice about resumes and the CV. However, it seems no one has given you much advice on the actual interview and what to do and say once you are in the “hot seat” sitting across the desk from your desired employer.

There are a few critical points to remember. The first is to remember that you are there to interview for a specific position and need to remain focused on your skills and qualifications as related to that position. Your job in that interview is to convince the interviewer that you are the best person to fill that position and that you have growth potential. Too often interviewees spend too much time focusing on unrelated skills and fail to fully express their ability to fulfill the job duties in the position they are applying for. Stay focused on the mission at hand.

Another error interviewees often make is jumping directly into discussions regarding salary and benefits. There are two kinds of employees: money-takers and money-makers. If you jump into the money talk first you are likely to come across as a money-taker rather than a money-maker. Any discussions regarding money should be instigated by the hiring party. After all, you don’t even know if they are interested in hiring you yet. Your focus should be on convincing them they can’t live without you. Once you have done that the money conversation will be brought up.

Remember, the interviewer is a professional and it is their job to make you feel comfortable so that you disclose things you may not otherwise choose to disclose. The interviewer is NOT your friend. Build a good rapport but do not let them distract you away from discussing your skills and qualifications for the position and into confessing the irrelevant or disclosing personal details that may not place you in the most flattering light. Keep the conversation on the skills you bring to the table and what you can offer the employer. If you focus on your skills, as related to the job you are interviewing for, and demonstrate the traits of a money-maker you are sure to make a good impression when you hit that “hot seat”. 

 

And so that’s Cissy of The Contemplative Belle‘s interview tips. Have a look at all of the All Stars entries here.

 

Good luck for any of my job-hunting readers out there! Do you have any good tips to share?