Recipe: Simple Beef & Carrot Stew (Black Pudding Optional!)

Okay, maybe this is turning into a bit of a foodie blog. Not that that is a bad thing – I love foodie blogs! But (I say defensively) I know so many people at university who simply cannot cook, who rely on oven meals like chicken nuggets, and their only “proper” meals are ready meals. Though to be honest even knowing how to cook isn’t the whole story – my boyfriend is a fabulous cook (he even makes chocolate fondant puddings and souffles!) but even he survived off ready meals for a while at university. It is unfortunately a huge opinion that cooking from scratch takes too much time, too much effort, and too much money. So I’m hoping that my recipes will change a few peoples minds, and get a few students cooking! And of course my recipes aren’t just for students – I like to think they are suitable for everyone, albeit with potentially scaling up as a lot of what I cook makes just one or two portions. What are you waiting for – get in the kitchen and learn to cook!

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This is another traditional-type recipe (a little more traditional and British that this casserole), very, very filling, very hearty, but slightly more expensive that what I would usually make. It’s not hugely expensive, probably around £2 per portion, and such comforting treat that occasionally it does no harm. Like with all my recent recipes I’ll try and do the costing, but bear in mind that I’m not particularly accurate!

The amounts I’m giving here made a HUGE meal for me and my boyfriend. If I was making it just for me, I’d probably stretch it to three meals, but my costings below assume it’s just being split into two.

Also, apologies for the pretty horrendous photos in this post – my kitchen was very crowded as at the time of preparation my boyfriend was also cooking this amazing breakfast – I am a lucky girl!

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Ingredients

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  • 300g approx of stewing/braising steak. I got mine from a local butchers, and they got me a cut out of the back that is perfect for a slow cooker. No idea what it was, but it cost £2.42 and was absolutely amazing! Probably some of the best I’ve eaten in a stew… You generally pay around £5 for 500g, so I’m going to estimate at £3 for the steak.
  • OPTIONAL – two slices of black pudding. I wouldn’t make a special trip just to buy black pudding for this, but I had some, and found it gave an extra meaty depth to the stew, as well as a warmth and spiciness. It melts down into the gravy, so suitable for even the most adamant “I don’t like black pudding” people. The sausage pictured cost me around 60p, it gave 10 slices, so 12p for this.
  • A couple of carrots. Probably costs around 10p.
  • Around a quarter of an onion. Probably around 5p, if that.
  • Some lard for frying. I’m not including this in the costing as the price in the amount used is tiny, and you could just as easily use whatever oil you have around.
  • Seasoned flour – 1 tablespoon of flour, mixed with finely ground black pepper, and a little paprika. 5p, if that.
  • Onion gravy – 10p for the amount used
  • Beef stock cube – around 10p per cube
  • To serve: three large potatoes (mashed with a little milk and butter), some cabbage, some broccoli – 50p maximum

All in all, around £4 (generously) for 2-3 portions of a good beef stew. Obviously as always it pays to shop around for your meat (do try and go to a local butcher), and bulk buy things like spices and stock cubes. But again this recipe shows that proper cooking doesn’t always have to be expensive.

Method

  • Heat some lard/oil in a wide pan. This is one recipe where I strongly advise searing and browning the meat before slow cooking, as it helps kickstart a meaty flavour and dark colour.
  • Whilst the fat is heating, slice your onion, and peel and slice your carrots.

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  • Toss your stewing steak in the seasoned flour until reasonably well coated. Doesn’t have to be perfect as you can see!

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  • Brown the meat in the pan, turning when seared on each side. You may need to do this in batches – transfer to your slow cooker pot when done.

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  • Add your onion slices to the pan, and quickly fry (stir often as they will catch easily on a high heat!) until turning golden. Throw these in your slow cooker too.

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  • Dice up your slices of black pudding, and try briefly until just beginning to crisp. Into the slow cooker these go…

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  • Finally toss the sliced carrots around the pan just to soak up any flavours.

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  • Once everything is in the slow cooker, make your sauce. Dissolve the stock cube and around 3-4 teaspoons of gravy in some boiling water. The mix should be quite thick.
  • Season it well with lots of black pepper. If you add too much black pepper, some lemon juice stirred through should counteract this – but be careful not to add too much as you don’t want a lemon taste.
  • Feel free to add any herbs you like to this recipe – I prefer my beef stew to be less messed about this, so I just stick to basic ingredients, but things like thyme work well.

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  • Add this to your slow cooker, cover, and turn to low. Leave it for at least six hours.

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  • After about eight hours (with the last hour turned to high, and lid off – to thicken the gravy) mine looked like this.

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  • Serve with mash and veg (and maybe a cheeky slice of bread for mopping up!) in a big bowl.

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  • If you don’t have a slow cooker, but in an ovenproof pot with a lid, and cook on 100-120 degrees for 4+ hours, although you may want to check that it doesn’t dry out.
  • Tip: I had some gravy leftover, so have frozen it in a bag ready to kickstart the flavour of another stew this winter. A bit like keeping a sourdough bread starter if you like!

So that’s that – a very simple beef stew, with optional black pudding. Let me know if you make this recipe! I know from last year that portions free really well (reheat in the oven on a low heat for a while though, it didn’t seem to taste as great microwaved/boiled!) so feel free to scale up and batch cook as it does take a while for the meat to render down to become tender. Does anyone have any tips for a really flavoursome beef stew/casserole?