Cooking From: Roasted Cauliflower & Caramelised Red Onion Salad (Fress)

“To eat copiously” is what the Yiddish word “Fress” means. And what a wonderfully appealing title for a cookery book that is. Masterchef finalist Emma Spitzer’s  book mergers the food of the Middle-East with that of Eastern Europe, incorporating her Polish and Russian heritage in a combination that is both homely and exciting. Spiced up comfort food, if you will. The recipes are appealing too, with Emma’s aim to get as much flavour as possible from a simple recipe without spending hours in the kitchen.

The book includes recipes for sharing, soups, big plates with meat and fish dishes (the Sticky Pomegranate Salmon looks especially good),  salads, and some sweet treats. There’s classics like Chicken Soup, which looks wonderfully comforting, something I’ll be sure to get W to make me the next time I’m under the weather. Of course, it helps that this book, this cover is the prettiest one to grace my bookshelves.

The recipe I’m reviewing today is aesthetically pleasing too. The cover recipe for the book, upon tasting it’s not hard to see why it was chosen as not only does it look good, it also tastes amazing. I’ve made the recipe as per the book several times, but the version I’m giving you today is my regular recipe – I generally cook it for lunchboxes, so I’ve made it even less complicated, using less pans, using less ingredients to make it a bit cost effective. I highly recommend you try the original version as the flavours are a lot more complex, but this basic salad is just as delicious.

Recipe – makes 3-4 lunch servings

  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 medium red onions, sliced relatively finely
  • 1 tbsp soft brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp of balsamic vinegar
  • 1 large cauliflower, broken into small-ish florets with the smaller leaves kept
  • 120g giant couscous, cooked as per pack instructions
  • 3 tsp za’atar spice
  • 100g blanched almonds
  • 3-4 tablespoons pomegranate seeds

Heat half of the oil in a large frying pan, and fry the onions with a little salt over a low heat until soft – around 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile toss the cauliflower florets in the remaining oil, spread out onto a baking tray and roast at 180C for 15 minutes – then add the za’tar and the cauliflower leaves, toss together (with some additional oil if it’s looking dry) and roast for another 10 minutes. Tip into a large bowl along with the cooked giant couscous.

When the onions are soft, turn up the heat to medium and turn in the sugar and balsamic vinegar, before cooking for around 5 minutes until sticky and caramelised. Add to the bowl along with a good grind of black pepper and toss everything together.

When ready to serve (at room temperature, not fridge cold), add 25g of almonds per serving, plus a tablespoon of pomegranate seeds. This is excellent on it’s own, alongside homemade pitta breads, or part of a Middle Eastern style spread (think hummus, falafel, spiced chicken, fesenjan…).

Have you tried any Middle Eastern recipes? What would you recommend?

Cooking From: Asian Salmon & Broccoli (The Roasting Tin)

Welcome to a new little series over at Life & Loves. With a ridiculously-sized collection of cookbooks that just keeps on getting bigger, we’ve set ourselves the challenge to use them more. To not cook from the same ones each time. To try out new recipes. And to make myself more accountable for this, I’m going to blog about it.

The first cookbook under scrutiny is The Roasting Tin. One of the most anticipated cookbook releases of 2017, even the cover with its bright yellow sunniness makes me want to pull it off the shelf. Added to the fact that it’s full of simple one-dish recipes that require little preparation and are generally ready fast but deliver flavourful, healthy results means it’s become regularly reached for.

It’s pretty much the perfect midweek cookery book for foodies. Good, fresh ingredients combined with just a few minutes work and very little washing up means a happy Chloe!

We’ve cooked a few things from this book, with the favourites being the recipe below, but also a veggie dish involving Broccoli, Orzo Pasta, Lemon and Chilli – it makes damn good leftovers! There’s so many other dishes we have on our list too! We’ve found the cooking times can be a bit off, so I’ve adjusted for it slightly in the recipe below – as well as playing around with the dressing to suit our tastes – mainly making more of it!

Now onto this recipe. It’s delicious! One of my favourite ways to eat salmon, it’s so simple and easy yet full of flavour. The dressing is punchy, the peanuts add crunch and the broccoli is yum. I rarely eat broc boiled or steamed now, I want it roasted all the time…

Recipe – for 2, easily scaled up or down

  • 300g broccoli, cut into small florets
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil (use vegetable oil if you don’t have any)
  • 2 salmon fillets
  • 2 spring onions, finely sliced
  • 2½ cm ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 red chilli, finely sliced
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 limes, zest and juice
  • Small handful of fresh coriander, chopped
  • 55g peanuts, left whole

Pop the broccoli in a roasting tin, add the garlic and sesame oil, and use your hands to coat. Place the salmon fillets on top, cover tightly with foil and bake for 25 minutes at 180C. Remove the foil for the last 10 minutes.

Meanwhile make the dressing. Mix together the spring onions, ginger, chilli, fish sauce, vegetable oil, lime zest and juice, most of the coriander and the peanuts. Once the salmon is cooked, pour the dressing over the roasting tin. Serve garnished with the rest of the coriander.

We would usually just eat this with no other carby side, but I can confirm it is delicious with brown rice if you feel like you need it! I’ve also taken to cooking broccoli this way, with the same dressing – it’s great served with noodles as a quick study day lunch.

What’s your current favourite cookbook?