Recipe: Leek & Blue Cheese Risotto

I’ve probably said this before, but I’m firmly of the belief that risotto is the perfect comfort food. Creamy, though not overly heavy, cheesy (but not greasy), and it can be loaded full of nourishing ingredients. When I’m feeling under the weather, need cheering up or just generally want some comfort food, it’s risotto that I turn to.

This recipe is perhaps a bit more indulgent than the risottos I tend to cook, with less emphasis on the vegetables, more cheese and a healthy dose of wine. Whilst I don’t tend to use wine in my risottos (why cook with it when you can drink it?!) I do find it pretty necessary in this one to add an extra note of background flavour. It intensifies the sweetness of the leeks, tempering the harshness of the blue cheese. And if you’ve opened a bottle to cook with, it would be rude not the finish it, right…?

#Recipe (generously serves 2)

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • Fresh thyme, leaves only (around a tbsp)
  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • 1 stick celery, finely chopped
  • 1 clove of garlic, finely chopped
  • 500ml vegetable stock
  • 150g risotto rice
  • 175ml white wine (roughly 2/3 of my large wine glass)
  • 2 leeks, sliced
  • A knob of butter
  • 100g blue cheese
  • 25g parmesan
  • 25g walnuts, roughly chopped

Gently fry the onion, celery and garlic in the oil for around 5 minutes until softened but not brown. Add the rice to the onions and stir for a couple of minutes until the grains are slightly translucent.

Increase the heat and add the wine, stirring until it is all evaporated. Then add the stock a ladelful at a time, again stirring until absorbed before adding more. Repeat until the rice looks creamy and tastes cooked – I find it takes 20 minutes but it varies depending on the type and brand of risotto rice.

Meanwhile, in a frying pan, gently fry the leeks and thyme in the butter. Add to the risotto when it is cooked with plenty of black pepper then crumble in the parmesan and most of the blue cheese. Cover, take off the heat, leave for 2-3 minutes, then serve sprinkled with the remaining blue cheese and some chopped walnuts.

Perfect for a cosy Friday-night in, or indeed a meat-free Monday meal! I also like it with some crisp bacon on top, although admittedly this adds to the washing up…

Are you a risotto fan? What’s your go-to comfort food?

Review: Posh Pizza at Hai Cenato, Victoria

These monthly pizza reviews could become a bit of a ‘thing’ here – I certainly enjoy writing them at any rate. Any excuse to eat cheesy carbs…

Today’s review is perhaps a little overdue, given that it was another place I visited on my birthday (basically, the day it’s completely acceptable to eat alllll the food). Especially since the pizza was so damn good and, actually, I’d been thinking about it ever since.

Hai Cenato, Jason Atherton’s New York-Italian restaurant and cocktail bar in Victoria, has been on my radar for a while. We met the main man at Pollen Street Social back in April last year, and *really* enjoyed the food there, so I was intrigued to try his take on pizza. With a decent selection of white pizzas I’m only surprised it took me so long to visit!

My beautiful friend ordered the Margherita – with San Marzano tomato, London mozzarella, basil & parmesan. Obviously I didn’t try any, but it both looked and smelt delicious, and it all got eaten so it must’ve been tasty!

And if my pizza was anything to go by, it was certainly tasty. I ordered a pizza with the description “mozzarella, guanciale, egg yolk, black pepper, confit potato.” I mean, egg yolk on a pizza?! How could I resist?! Guanciale turned out to be Italian cured pig cheek, so vegetarians perhaps should be a little wary when ordering, but I have to say it was delicious. A world away from the last potato pizza I tried at Mother LDN, both lighter and more indulgent at the same time. There was just enough potato to be substantial without making me need a nap, the egg yolk was rich and added creaminess and the base was cooked to perfection. I’d put this in my top five pizzas of all time – though the order of which I’m not sure I could commit to paper/a screen.

As for the atmosphere, this seems to have been plagued with criticism in online reviews. I have to say I really enjoyed it. Service was friendly (plus they bought me a complimentary ice-cream with a candle in as I’d mentioned it was my birthday!), the music buzzy without being overly loud. The toilets were also insanely pretty, to the point I regretted not taking my phone so I could Instagram them…

Would I head into Victoria ‘just’ for a pizza again? Yes I would. It’s not going to replace our go-to treat on payday (cheers Dynamo), it’s the perfect date-night spot, and the perfect place to get a ‘special’ pizza. I know I’ll definitely be dragging W there asap!

Have you ever visited Hai Cenato? Where’s your favourite pizza spot?

Food: Favourite Foodie Instagrammers and Hashtags

One of my favourite past-times is scrolling through Instagram. Sure, it drives me mad as I’m finding it impossible to grow my own platform, but I love looking at people’s food styling, people’s pretty plates, yummy bakes and creative dinners. I quite often do round-ups of my favourite accounts on my Stories, but thought I’d do a proper, more permanent one on here too…

What I’ve done is included an embedded picture on their account – choosing on of my favourites from recent weeks. I hope you find new accounts you can follow! (above photo is the un-squared version of my most liked ‘gram of 2017)

Figs & Pigs – blog link

A post shared by rebecca (@figsandpigsinsta) on

Rebecca is one of the people that has really inspired my own photography style – I’ve followed her for a while, but her dark photography really stood out for me. It’s the styling that does it as it always looks both perfect, effortless and totally in keeping with whatever plate of yumminess she’s snapping. And her recipes sound delicious too. I mean, Buttermilk Roast Chicken with Sourdough, Leek and Pancetta Stuffing

Onelifetobake – blog link

A post shared by Hazel Rodrigues (@onelifetobake) on

Hazel’s grid is the perfect mis-match of food and lifestyle photos – very much a heavy focus on food, but like me she seems a sucker for a pretty building! One of my favourite things about this feed is the captions – it’s like a mini-blog and I love the personality it gives! Oh, and she has a recipe for Gin & Tonic Cheesecake. Nuff said.


I genuinely don’t know how this profile doesn’t have more followers! Every single picture is perfectly thought out and styled, everything looks yummy. I love the usual backgrounds used too – not the usual tea towel or chopping board (I’m guilty of both!).

LettuceFlourish – blog link

This one is quite different from a lot of the styles I love – I’m really into dark and moody photography, this is lighter, brighter and more cheerful. But how damn good do Annette’s Turkish Eggs look?! Her pics almost always make me click straight through to her blog and I plan to make a lot of her recipes.

Nordic Food Tales – blog link

I mean, just go and look at this feed! It’s absolutely stunning, I could spend hours scrolling down it  – and yep, it was a real struggle to only choose one recent photo to embed. In the end I couldn’t resist this photo of a sexxed up hot chocolate. They’ve made a bog standard hot chocolate completely seasonal with chesnut puree and orange. If someone could whip me a great big mug up right now that would be very much appreciated, please and thank you!

And that’s it – a quick round-up of just some of my favourite Instagram accounts. And now onto hashtags – I love #darktablemood, #darkfoodphotography, #foodandflatlay, #foodieflatlay, #beautifulfood, #storyofmytable, #scrumptiouskitchen, and #platedpics.

I’d love to know your favourite Instagram accounts and hashtags too!

Recipe: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies

Just before Christmas I wanted a quick and easy cookie recipe. Something that looked special, tasted amazing and was reasonably “wintery” or festive looking. Something that meant mince pie haters (ahem, me) wouldn’t feel left out at a mulled wine and mince pie gathering. I found a recipe for Chocolate Crinkle Cookies, tweaked it a bit and came up with these beauties.

Chocolatey without being too rich, soft and chewy, and so pretty to look at. They were perfect, easy to make (if not overly quick due to needing a spell in the fridge), and went down so, so well. They also kept for a good few days in an airtight container – I originally made around 80 and not unsurprisingly we couldn’t quite eat them all straight away! As an added bonus the rolled dough, without the icing sugar dusting, froze well too. I’d recommend defrosting slightly before coating and baking.

Recipe – for around 25 cookies, easy to divide and multiply

  • 2 1/3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1⁄4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1⁄4 cup cocoa, unsweetened
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • pinch salt
  • 1/2 cup icing sugar, for rolling

In a bowl, stir together sugar and oil before blending in the cocoa powder – I find it best to do this gradually as it can go a little lumpy. Beat in egg (again, I do this gradually) followed by the vanilla and salt. Sift over the flour and baking powder, then folder the mix together. Note that the mix will be a lot more fudge-like that normal cookie dough! Pop the dough into the fridge for at least two hours.

Use teaspoons to scoop out portions of the mix, then roll into balls (they should be around 1 inch in diameter). Roll each ball in the icing sugar until fully coated, then place on a baking sheet lined with greaseproof paper. As these cookies spread, I’d avoid putting them too close together! Bake the cookies in batches at 175 for around 11-13 minutes – they will look gooey in between the cracks, but should firm up when cooled. Allow to cool for 5 minutes on the trays, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Enjoy at any time of the day – we made have had these as a cheeky breakfast on my sister’s birthday!

What’s your current favourite cookie recipe?

Recipe: Bacon, Feta & Lentil Salad (warm or cold)

This is an absolute staple in our household. We make a big batch at least once a month, usually doing me for a week of lunches, one evening meal for the two of us and possible W’s lunch group (for 5) too. It’s tasty, filling and healthy – a portion or so of veg, plenty of protein and just general yums.

What’s even better is that it works hot and cold. W in particular loves it warm, with sausages and steamed green veg. I love it cold of a lunch time, with plenty of spinach. It’s also great with a spot of extra stock, turned into a bit of a soup with leftover roast chicken. Mushrooms work well too, as does a spot of roasted kale. It’s so, so versatile. If we don’t quite have the ‘right’ ingredients we can switch things up – leave out the celery, use a different kind of stock, different herbs, add mustard, add white wine vinegar. Be luxurious with a splash of cream. Leave out the feta. Leave out the bacon. Ad different cheeses, extra bacon. The possibilities are pretty much endless, and that’s why we love this recipe so much.

Recipe – makes around 5 big portions

  • 200g dried brown lentils
  • 4 rashers thick streaky bacon, or equivalent rate of lardons
  • 2 onions
  • 2 sticks celery
  • 2 carrots
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Herbs – I like a combination of thyme and tarragon, but rosemary also works well
  • Chicken stock
  • Handful of Greek feta, crumbled
  • Optional – dijon mustard, white wine vinegar, mushrooms etc…

Fry the bacon in a little oil until starting to crisp. Meanwhile, chop the veg finely, before adding to the bacon and frying over a low heat until soft. If you’re using dried herbs, add with the veg. Add the lentils to the pan, then add chicken stock until they are just covered. Stir in any fresh herbs, if using, then simmer for around 30-45 minutes, or until the lentils are cooked to your liking. If adding them, stir though a teaspoon of dijon mustard and a scant teaspoon of white wine vinegar, tasting to adjust to your liking. Season with salt and plenty of black pepper, before serving warm or cold, scattered with feta. I also find it goes really well with baby spinach leaves.

Do you have any similar recipes that are good for batch-prepping lunchboxes?

Food: How My Cooking & Ingredient-Shopping Has Changed Over Time

I started this blog way back in 2012, before I headed off to university, before I was responsible for my own food shop. I’d like to think my cooking has gotten a lot better in this time (it’s certainly got a lot more adventurous!), but I know a whole lot has changed about what I buy, what I cook, what I order in a restaurant. I’ve grown up and my tastes have changed – which considering I was probably only 17 when I started writing makes a whole lotta sense!


Back when I started university, and in fact most of the way through my degree, my weekly food budget was a maximum of £20. And it worked. Most weeks I spent around £15, some weeks it would be £25 but more often that not I came in on budget. Nowadays I am part of a pair, but our weekly food budget is still a fairly thrifty £50. We try to include “housekeeping” in this too, be it loo roll or cleaning items. Obviously there’s weeks it’s over, like the time someone (ahem, me) accidentally over-ordered in the butchers to the tune of £40 worth of meat for what was meant to be one meal – there’s still nearly half of that in the freezer. I actually quite like sticking to a budget, it’s made us more inventive, we eat more seasonally (it’s noticeably more expensive to buy out-of-season and imported produce) and when we do treat ourselves it feels more special.


This is where I’ve probably changed the most. At the start of my cooking journey, a tub of dried mixed herbs would do for everything and anything. Yep. It actually makes me cringe to think back as I’m sure most of my dishes must have tasted exactly the same. As I started to enjoy cooking more and more my dried herb collection grew, but now I’ve gone in completely the other direction – fresh herbs. Whether it’s coriander to garnish curries (usually blitzing the stalks into the paste), or thyme up a roast chicken’s bottom, the flavours are just so much better.

One of my major points of embarrassment is that I used to try and replace fresh coriander in recipes with the spice. Nope. Just no.


Likewise, my spice rack has grown considerably. I’m pretty sure my go-to spices when I moved to university were curry powder, cumin and chilli flakes. Which was probably more than some of my housemates had in first year (given the amount of times they used to go ‘missing’), but even so – I know have a whole cupboard dedicated to spices. And it’s not even a small cupboard. From the individual whole spices (so we can make our own distinctive blends of curry powder no less), to two types of paprika, three jars of cinnamon (not entirely sure why), and fancy thinks like za’tar and sumac. I genuinely don’t think I’d get through a week with such a basic spice rack anymore!


Now, I’m not ever likely to be vegetarian. I love animals, I really do, and I’m also very environmentally concious – but I also recognise that my body runs best when I eat some meat. However over the last year I’ve cut down the amount I eat and started buying from local butchers rather than supermarkets. No doubt about it, it’s pricier BUT I can tell you want farms it has come from, exactly how the animal is kept and it also tastes so much better. We try and eat vegetarian dinners at least twice a week, if not more, and I am absolutely loving experimenting a bit more with veg. Expect a lot more veggie recipes in 2018!

Things I “Don’t Like”

When I met W at 16 I was a reasonably fussy eater – in particular I ate no fruit, and was picky about what vegetables I ate. I didn’t like peas or carrots, cauliflower was a no go and I never really ate pulses. Nowadays I’m a lot better. I still don’t like plain boiled/steam carrots, but will eat them roasted, stewed, raw or stir-fried. I’ll eat roasted cauliflower. Peas are no problem. My fruit intake is better (not that that’s difficult!) but I do find it irritates my stomach so don’t eat a huge amount. I do now like cooked fruit through – helllooooo crumbles!

I also really, realllyyyyy used to dislike fruit in savoury dishes – however the above Cauliflower, Caramelised Onion and Pomegranate Salad is one of my current fav lunchbox dishes!

Fruit & Veg

Keeping on the topic of fruit and veg, I know buy a LOT more. We try and buy loose pieces where possible, to avoid excessive packaging and also to pick out the freshest bits. We also try to eat seasonally – it’s not always easy, given you can pretty much buy anything your heart desires in the Sainsburys aisle, but we do try. Our next plan is to find a veg delivery box we are happy with. We’ve tried a couple and been sorely disappointed so any recommendations would be great!

The long term plan? I’d love to have an allotment or veg patch to grow our own. This isn’t going to happen for a long, long time, but it’s been a dream of mine for a while. My paternal Granddad kept an allotment until very late in his life, and I guarantee there is nothing better than vegetables picked on the day. Homemade grown rhubarb in particular is a delight.

Buying Premium

As I said earlier in this post, we do still stick to a budget when it comes to food shopping – living in London means despite my good graduate wage we don’t have a huge amount of spare cash. However there are some things we do splash out on. We buy decent eggs, particularly for breakfasts. I’ll still buy supermarkets own (free range, of course) for baking, but I’ll treat us to some extra special ones with bright golden yolks for a good brunch. Our biggest “extravgence” however is pasta. Own-brand pasta just doesn’t cut it for us any more, so we’ll buy premium brands or make our own. I think it’s because we don’t tend to have hugely flavoured sauces, veering to more delicate choices (like this Fennel Linguine) – so the pasta needs to taste good. This brand is particular good (available in Sainsburys).

And that’s pretty much it. On the whole I’ve got a lot more adventurous with my cooking, trying out new cusines, new flavours, new recipes. How has your cooking style changed over the years?

Review: Adventurous Pizza Toppings @ 400 Rabbits, Gipsy Hill

Another week, another pizza restaurant review.

Despite being allergic to tomatoes, and therefore relatively limited in options, pizza is my go-to food when me and W are planning a casual date-night. Spoiled by having the Dynamo ridiculously close to our old flat (it’s about an 8 minutes walk now which feels terribly far away!), we’re now starting to branch out a little bit. Mother LDN was first on our hit list, but next we ventured all the way out to darkest Zone 3 for a dinner at 400 Rabbits.

Highly recommended by Amanda, I was drawn in by the specials menu (which was unfortunately was out of date on their site, so no salt-marsh lamb or beetroot pesto for me) and rather Instagrammable decor. What I didn’t know about was the rather steep hill I had to traverse from the station – already hangry I can’t imagine I was the best company on that walk!

That said, we were welcomed (puffing) extremely warmly, offered drinks incredibly quickly – with my white wine being really rather pleasant (despite smelling far too sweet and flowery), and W’s foraged fruit and seaweed beer slipping down quite quickly! Pizzas also arrived quickly, perhaps they sensed my desperate need for food…

Looking back, I’m pretty sure W went for the “Aged Rare Breed Beef, Green Chillies, Onion , Tomato And Mozzarella” which he thoroughly enjoyed. I have to say the tomato sauce did look particularly good and rich here!

I took a huge leap out of my comfort zone and ordered the no-tomato special available at the time – Ortiz Tuna, Red Onions, Capers, Crème Fraiche and a Burnt Aubergine Yoghurt. As someone who claims she doesn’t like tuna I was taking a massive risk, but fortunately it paid off.  Everything was well-balanced, and the tuna was a world away from the dreadful tinned stuff I remember. Served in big chunks, alongside juuuusssst softened onions it was perfect. The aubergine yoghurt was a delight, and I wish I’d ordered extra to dip my crusts in. The base of the pizza was pretty perfect, no hint of dryness, over-burning or sogginess. My only complaint was the overwhelming garlic flavour I got from my pizza, which did leave me struggling to finish.

That said, we did managed to squeeze in some Gelupo Gelato too. My Malted Milk & Salted Caramel combo was delish, as was W’s Blood Orange sorbet with Bitter Chocolate. Perhaps not quite as good as my favourite ice-cream place (to be revealed as soon as I’m willing to share!) but delicious in it’s own right!

I’ve tried a lot of pizza places this year, and 400 Rabbits was one of my favourites. Inventive toppings with a seasonal focus, an excellent base and good atmosphere. If only it didn’t take me the best part of an hour to get there!

Where’s your favourite pizza place?

Food: My Kitchen Goals for 2018

As a food blogger I’m pretty much always in the kitchen or reading cookbooks. Thinking up new flavour combinations, easier ways to make classic dishes. Or I’ll be reading some of my favourite blogs, putting even more restaurants on my list… either way, food is a massive part of my life and there’s still so much more I have to try. Here’s just a few of the things I want to tick off in 2018!

Embarrassingly, some of these I’ve probably mentioned as goals before on this blog. However, as it’s a New Year, let’s wipe the slate clean and start again!

  • Improve my cake decorating skills. I shamefully tend to get W to ice any cakes that need it (case in point: my birthday cake last month). I’d love to be at the stage where I feel comfortable with a piping bag, although I’m not sure how likely it is that I’ll achieve such a goal this year!
  • Make our our pasta more often. It tastes SO much better than shop-bought.
  • Eat amazing food on our honeymoon. I don’t actually know where we’ll be flying off to, as W has booked the whole thing as a surprise, however I am pretty damn sure that there will be yummy food involved! Stay tuned in October and you’ll find out!
  • Make a “proper” pie from scratch. We quite often have a pie during the week, but the filling will be a quite casserole of leftovers, with a sheet of puff pastry baked on top. I’d love to make a pie from scratch, with pastry all the way round the perfect filling.
  • Learn more about Chinese and Asian cooking. In particular I’d love to give dumplings a go!
  • Tick off one or two more Michelin Starred restaurants. I managed to visit Pollen Street Social and Galvin La Chapelle in 2017, so I’d love to try a few more this year. Where would you recommend?
  • Make sure I eat a vegetarian dinner at least once a week. We’d like to make our meat purchasing more ethical, but to do that we need to eat less of it purely from a cost perspective!
  • Find a decent fruit and veg delivery system. Do you get a weekly food box? We’ve tried a couple and haven’t been overly impressed so would really appreciate some recommendations!
  • Actually manage to make and keep a sourdough starter alive. It’s alluded us several times in the past…

What do you want to achieve in the kitchen this year?

Recipe: Rose, White Chocolate & Pistachio Layer Cake

Welcome to the first recipe of 2018! I had (utterly stupid!) anxiety about deciding which recipe should kick off 2018 here on the blog, but in the end I decided to go with cake for several reasons. One, cake. Need I say more. Two, this was one of the last bakes I made in 2017, it was delicious as my birthday cake and something a little bit different. And three – I get married this year. It’s the year I get to eat the most important cake of my life. And so here is a rather yummy cake recipe for you all.

I don’t usually make my own birthday cake – leaving it to W (he once made a frankly terrifying Caterpillar cake) or my dad (who’s created some pretty awesome ones over the years – the highlight being a four-layer ombre chocolate-caramel one for my 21st). This year, however, with the day off before and W busy at university, I decided to give it a go. I used Lucy’s book, as the bakes tend to only need one bowl and anything which results in less washing up is already a winner in my eye. Me being me, I tinkered with the recipe slightly. I made a smaller cake, used a sandwich tin, reduced the poppy seeds, upped the white chocolate and added pistachios.

The rose is definitely the strongest flavour in this cake, but it isn’t at all overpowering. The poppy seeds add a good texture, the white chocolate adds creaminess and the pistachios mellow the slight soapiness of the rose. It worked perfectly as a birthday cake (complete with candles!) but I imagine it would be wonderful for an office cake sale, or as a gift for a friend. I’m also thinking cupcake versions would be delightful!

Recipe (makes a 21cm cake, serving 8 generous slices)

  • 3 eggs
  • Self raising flour
  • Butter – some for the cake (approx 90g) and 200g for the icing
  • Margarine
  • Caster sugar
  • 25g poppy seeds
  • Rose water
  • 100g white chocolat
  • 300g icing sugar
  • Pink food colouring
  • Pistachios

Grease and line two 21cm sandwich tins. Weigh the eggs in their shells (as a heads up, it’s probably around 180g), then weigh out that amount of both self-raising flour and caster sugar. You also want to weight out half that amount of both margarine and butter.

Beat the butter and margarine together until it’s soft (this job is a lot easier if they’re at room temperature), then add the sugar and cream together until the mix is fluffy and no longer gritty. Sift in the flour, add a pinch of salt and gently fold together. Fold in the poppy seeds and 15g of rosewater, then pour into the prepared tins. Smooth the tops and bake at 180C for around 20 minutes.

All the cakes to cool fully on a wire rack before making the icing. Melt the white chocolate slowly, stirring occasionally, then allow to cool for 15 minutes. You want it to be completely cooled to room temperature, without it setting. Beat the butter until soft and smooth, then add the cooled white chocolate and beat to combine. Add the icing sugar and beat together until creamy and light – I tend to do this in thirds to stop *too* much icing sugar flying everywhere. Beat in 15g of rosewater and a few drops of food colouring, before using to sandwich your cakes together and ice the top.

Roughly chop some pistachio nuts and arrange on top – you could also top with white chocolate curls, rose petals or even freeze-dried raspberries.

And that’s it – I’ve also followed the same ratios (equal weight flour/sugar/butter/eggs) for a standard Victoria sponge with success, so I’ll be forever thankful to Lucy for this method! Though I’m now obsessed with rosewater; it can be a pricey ingredient, but have a look in the World Food aisle of your local supermarket. I found a large bottle in Sainsburys for £1, whilst in the exact same store there was a much smaller bottle (in the baking aisle) for £4…

What’s your go-to cake recipe?

Recipe: Red Onion & Goat’s Cheese Quiche

Quiche was always something that intimidated me. It just seemed so complicated – baking pastry, prepping a filling, making a basic egg custard mix. A lot of work and, in all honest, I’d never enjoyed the shop-bought ones I’d tried so why bother?

Well, it would seem I’ve been missing out all this time!

When we decided a bit foolishly to cater most of our engagement party way back in Summer’16 we made two quiches (on the morning of the party). One was a Quiche Lorraine which was absolutely delicious and something I really need to make again ASAP. The other was this one. This is what started my love affair with goat’s cheese off, and what a way to begin an infatuation.

Crisp, buttery pastry (I’ll be posting a recipe soon, but you’ll be pleased to know it works just as well with ready-made, ready-rolled stuff – because sometimes life is just too short). Sweet red onions, caramelised with just a little bit of a bite. Punchy goat’s cheese. Soft and juuussssstttttt set egg filling, lightly infused with thyme and almost spicy with black pepper. Yep, it’s as delicious as it sounds.

And bonus. I discovered you don’t need to faff around making any type of custard for quiches. Game changer.

Recipe (makes 6 servings generous to eat alone with a side salad, more if serving with new potatoes or as part of a buffet – based on a Donal Skehan recipe)

  • 25g butter
  • 3 large red onions, sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 4 medium eggs
  • 300ml double cream
  • 150g soft curd goat’s cheese
  • 2-3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only

If you’re making your own pastry (this recipe is a good basic one) then do this first, then place in the fridge. Roll out (or use shop-bought!) and use to line a 23cm tart tin – place back in the fridge whilst you wait for the over to reach 190C. Pop a baking tin (large enough to fit the tart tin) in the oven whilst it warms. Once up to temperature, line the pastry with greasproof, fill with baking beans, pop onto the hot tray and bake for 10 minutes. Remove the beans and greaseproof (they will be insanely hot), turn the oven down to 180C and bake for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.

To make the filling, heat the butter and a pinch of salt in your largest frying pan, add the red onions and the dried thyme and fry over a low-medium heat for 10-15 minutes until soft and caramelised. Season with plenty of black pepper, then allow to cool.

Whisk the eggs and cream together until just combined. Stir through around 25g of the goat’s cheese. Arrange the onions on the base of the pastry case, scatter over spoonfuls of the goats cheese (try and disperse this evenly, or you’ll be fighting over the cheesiest slice!) and season a little more. Gently pour the egg and cream mixture into the pastry case, sprinkle with the fresh thyme and bake in the oven for 30 minutes until the filling is set. I sometimes like to be extra naughty and sprinkle a little grated parmesan over the top for the final five minutes, just to add an extra golden colour.

Allow to cool, then serve warm (not hot!) or cold. It’s wonderful on it’s own with a simple salad of leaves and raw beetroot, alongside new potatoes or simply as part of a picnic or buffet. Oh, it sits nicely in the fridge for 2-3 days so is perfect for a meat-free Monday dinner and a couple of lunches.

An indulgent recipe for sure, but what’s life without a bit of tasty, cheese goodness?!

Have you ever made your own quiche?