Recipe: Super Easy Peanut Butter Fudge

Yep, peanut butter fudge. It’s as glorious as it sounds. Rich and sweet, with a salty bite and the occasional crunch of a peanut mixed in with the smooth melting texture of a classic fudge.

It’s also ridiculously easy to make and hugely addictive to eat – two factors which are extremely dangerous given that I’ll be having wedding dress fittings in the next few months. I wonder if they can make the waist elasticated…?!

Back onto the point. This really is a doddle to make. There’s no measuring the precise temperature of the mix, no boiling for hours on end. A quick mix, a slow melt, rapid boil, more mixing and then time to set. In fact, the most complex part of the recipe is (to me) lining the tin! I told you it was easy…

So easy, in fact, I’m almost embarrassed I’ve never made fudge before and was actually rather scared when Lucy at the Ginger Whisk Cooking School told me I was going to be making it. I’ll be reviewing the class I took with her in more detail soon, but this recipe is based on hers (in her new book!) and it’s an absolute cracker!

Recipe (made roughly 15 decent sized chunks)

  • 50g unsalted butter
  • 200g soft brown sugar
  • 50g whole milk
  • 100g peanut butter (the cheapest brands work well – both myself and Lucy used Sainsburys Basics with sucess)
  • 120g icing sugar

This amount of mix fits nicely in a ‘takeaway container’ (aka those microwaveable plastic containers than are always so useful!) so line one well with greaseproof paper.

Pop the butter, brown sugar and milk into a warm pan and warm over a very low heat, stirring, until all of the sugar is dissolved. Once the mix is no longer gritty you can increase the heat. Boiling for 1 minute gives a softer fudge which I prefer, whilst anything longer up to 3 minutes will give a crumblier, more ‘tablet’ style that’s equally as delicious.

After boiling, remove from the heat and stir in the peanut butter until combined. Beat in the icing sugar (you should beat until the mix is nice and smooth) before pouring into the prepared tin, levelling the top and leaving to cool. Slice into squares and enjoy!

In this photos I sprinkle the molten mix with freeze-dried raspberries before cooling (pressing them in slightly and singing my fingers in the process). Absolutely delicious as they added a sharp kick that broke up the richness, reminding me of the somewhat classic ‘peanut butter and jelly’ combination. You could just as easily keep the fudge plain or, as I plan to for Christmas presents, drizzle with chocolate. Because chocolate.

Have you ever made fudge? Did you expect it to be so easy?!