Recipe: Haggis Carbonara for Burn’s Night

I love haggis, but I totally get that it isn’t for everyone. Particularly if you’ve never tried it, yet you’ve googled what’s in it. I’m of the opinion that if I’m willing to eat meat I should be willing to eat all meat, so things like haggis, black pudding and offal don’t bother me at all – but I still understand that it can turn people’s stomachs a tad! With this in mind I wanted to create a Haggis dish which is perfect as the ‘introduction’ to haggis. Haggis for beginners, if you will.

 photo Haggis Carbonara_zpsglm4oomv.jpg photo Haggis Carbonara 9_zps39wa1lek.jpgAnd so Haggis Carbonara was born.

Instead of a lump of haggis you’ve got crumbled up bits throughout the carbonara sauce. You’ve got cheesy creaminess to break up the strong pepperiness of the haggis. And pasta, because you can’t go wrong with carbs. In fact the haggis pasta combo is a winner in my book. This dish is rich, hearty and unbelievably comforting. Perfect for a Burn’s Night supper in – and great if you want to give haggis a go this January.

 photo Haggis Carbonara 8_zpswhef8xoo.jpg photo Haggis Carbonara 19_zpssc66rv8s.jpgRecipe (serves 2)

  • Decent knob of butter
  • 2 rounds of haggis (I used patties – cheaper and less scary than getting a ‘whole’ haggis!)
  • 2 eggs – one whole and one yolk only (freeze the white for making meringues)
  • A good handful of cheese – I went for parmesan and a good grating of a Scottish cheddar
  • 180g pasta – spaghetti or tagliatelle is best really

First of put the pasta on to boil. I find 10 minutes is about right for most pastas. Meanwhile fry your haggis in butter – I crumbled mine up completely, but you could leave it in bigger chunks. I’d say crumbled is easier if you’re just starting out with haggis though! While that’s frying beat the egg and yolk in a mug and add your grated cheeses (keep some back for sprinkling on top!).

Now my secret for carbonara – take a tablespoon of the boiling pasta water (while the pasta is still cooking) and dribble it into the egg-cheese while beating with a fork. Do the same with another spoon – and repeat until the cheese has melted and you have a smooth mixture. Not only does this lighten the sauce but it also seems to reduce the risk of ending up with scrambled eggs.

Once the pasta has boiled, drain (reserve some water), and tip straight in with the haggis. Toss together. Turn the heat off, and wait a few minutes. Add the egg mixture gradually (tossing well between additions) into the pasta. If it starts to scramble don’t add any more; wait another minute but stir through some cooking water. Once all the egg is in, if its not quite cooked enough to your liking (I’m not fussy about really runny egg!) put the pan back on a very low heat. Then serve, sprinkle with extra cheese and eat as quickly as possible. Trust me, cold carbonara isn’t a good thing!

And if you want to make my (legendary) carbonara without the haggis, simply fry a little bacon until crisp and follow the same recipe, adding plenty of black pepper. I personally think haggis is peppery enough so wouldn’t add any to this particular dish.

 photo Haggis Carbonara 15_zpsy1awggq5.jpg photo Haggis Carbonara 20_zpsg7llbs9q.jpg photo Haggis Carbonara 13_zpss4wzzeso.jpgI originally posted this recipe a good 5 years ago now (with some pretty wonderful photos I must admit) and it’s been one of my most popular posts. So much so I thought some up to date camera skills were needed!

*In the interests of complete disclosure the post was originally in collaboration with Sykes Cottages, but I’ve not had any request to rewrite the post! 

Have you ever tried haggis?