Cooking From: Moo Pad Prik (Stir Fried Chilli Pork) from the Easy Thai Cookbook

I’ve been saying it for months, but I really want to try cooking more authentic Asian food and follow actual recipes. I can cook a great stir-fry (see my storecupboard recipe here), but it’s far from traditional and there’s a whole world of recipes out there to explore.

 photo Stir-Fried Chilli Pork 5_zpsz29j2lwj.jpgI think in my head, I’ve always perceived authentic Thai cooking in particular to be very complex, very time consuming, and very expensive to buy all of the necessary hard-to-find ingredients. And in some cases that is true – the book I’m posting about had a lot of ingredients I wasn’t sure where to find, how to prepare or even what they were (is it a fruit? a spice?). But that was only a really small sub-section of the recipes, with the vast majority of them being easy to follow, kind to the purse-strings and quick to put together.

The Easy Thai Cookbook by Sallie Morris*, aims to encourage you e seeing a little less of your local take-away driver and lot more variety on your plate. Showcasing the ingredients and techniques used in Thai cookery, there’s over 70 delicious sounding recipes and a very detailed guide on ingredients and equipment. I definitely feel a little more confident venturing to my local Thai store now (though it’s not needed for this recipe!).

 photo Easy Thai Cookbook_zps78rk3lee.jpgOnto this recipe, and I have a feeling it’s going to become a firm favourite. Pork fillet is a pretty bargainous cut of meat, costing around £4 for a full fillet which easily fed two of us (and we’re greedy!) for two meals. It is quite easy to dry out so needs careful cooking, but it’s perfect in a stir-fry style recipe. We served this pretty simply with a small amount of rice, and some courgettes tossed in a soy and basil dressing – it made for a speedy, tasty and light Saturday night supper.

Recipe (served 2)

  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1/2 a pork fillet, around 200-250g
  • 1 small onion, finely sliced
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic (we used two)
  • 1 red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
  • 2 spring onions, cut into lengths and quartered
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • Lots of freshly ground black pepper

First off, trim any excess fat off your pork, and slice into thin rounds of equal thickness. Make sure the rest of our ingredients are chopped and ready to go.

Heat a wok, add the oil and, once it’s hot and shimmering, toss in the pork, onion and garlic. Stir-fry for 5 or so minutes until the pork is almost cooked through, then add the remaining ingredients and toss together until the pork is cooked.Season and serve immediately.

 photo Stir-Fried Chilli Pork 6_zps3pftfx1m.jpgTold you it was easy – and despite the relatively short list of ingredients it was super-tasty. The pork stayed tender, with the quick cooking time preventing it from drying out. I also loved the garlicky taste combined with the fish sauce – really savoury, but it avoided being over-salty too. Definitely one to make again…

*I received a copy of the Easy Thai Cookbook to review however all opinions are, as always, my own.

Are you a fan of Thai food? What’s your favourite Thai recipe?

Recipe: From-Scratch Laksa (Spicy Malaysian Noodle Soup with Chicken, Prawns & Egg)

As part of my foodie goals this year, I really wanted to start eating and cooking more authentic Asian cuisine. My standard stir-fry is all well and good, but I wanted to play with new-to-me ingredients, try new techniques and produce some really exciting dishes. This laksa might not be complicated (though it does create a huge amount of washing up!), but it tastes wonderful.

Generally, laksa is a spicy broth, served over rice noodles with chicken and prawns. I’ve added a little coconut milk to my version, both to temper the spice and also to make it smoother and creamier. I’ve also added a soft-boiled egg, because I’ve come to love the flavour of an oozing egg yolk in spicier foods. The whole thing is sweat-inducingly spicy, and somehow subtly combines sweet, salty and sour notes. It makes for a wonderful Friday night fakeaway, and I know I’ll be making this again and again.

The key to a good laksa, as I’ve discovered, is taking the time to make your own paste. I’ve used ready-prepared ones and they just aren’t quite the same. Yes, it might take a while (both to make and also to hunt down some of the ingredients) but it’s well worth it – and my quantities here make double the amount needed. I’ve frozen it in an ice-cube tray so I can make laksa whenever the mood strikes me.

Oh, and for an even quicker version I have made this using leftover roast chicken and ready cooked prawns. If the paste has been ready-made it’s the perfect quick after-work supper – and it’s wonderful if you’ve got a cold brewing!

This recipe was based on Ping Coobes version in Delicious Magazine. I’ve simplified it a bit based on the ingredients I was able to find – some of them you may need to hunt down in your local Asian supermarket (I specifically struggled finding shrimp paste and galangal).

Recipe for the Laksa Pasta (enough for 4 servings)

  • 1 tsp of dried chilli flakes
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 3 fresh red chillies, roughly chopped
  • 4 shallots, roughly chopped
  • 4 lemongrass stalks, bottom part only, roughly chopped
  • 30g fresh galangal, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 30g fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 tbsp ground turmeric
  • 2 tbsp shrimp paste
  • 25g peanuts
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil

To make the paste, simply whizz all of the ingredients in a food processor until you have a rough paste – add a little extra oil if you need to. I used my mini-chopped and found I had to do it in batches.

Recipe for the Laksa (serves 2)

  • 50g vegetable oil
  • Half quantity of the Laksa pasta, above
  • 2 skinless and boneless chicken thigh fillets
  • Tops of the lemongrass discarded when making the paste
  • Handful of raw prawns
  • 750ml chicken stock
  • 150ml coconut milk
  • 2 nests of dried rice noodles, cooked according to pack instructions
  • Bunch fresh mint, leaves only
  • 1 medium egg, boiled for 5 minutes (soft boiled) or 7 minutes (hard boiled), peeled
  • Handful of peanuts, roughly chopped
  • Lime wedges for garnish

Heat the oil in a wok frying pan over a medium heat. Add the laksa paste and reduce the heat to the lowest setting, and fry for at least 15 minutes, stirring from time to time. I try to fry for 30-40 minutes to really develop the flavour.

Put the chicken in a pan with half of the stock and the lemongrass, then simmer for 15 minutes until cooked through. Remove from the pan and allow to cool before slicing into strips. Add the raw prawns to the stock and cook for 2-3 minutes until cooked, then transfer to the plate with the chicken. Skim off the scum from the surface of the poaching liquid and discard the lemongrass, before adding the rest of the stock and the coconut milk.

Once the paste has cooked, add it to the stock and coconut mixture, and allow to simmer for 15 or so minutes before straining the broth through a sieve. Taste and season if necessary. Bring the broth back to the boil. Portion out the noodles, chicken and prawns into two bowls, and pour the boiling broth over the top. Sprinkle with mint leaves, chopped peanuts and a squeeze of lime, and finish with half of the boiled egg.

As you can probably tell, it does make a huge amount of washing up – but it’s well worth it! The flavours are insanely complex, I couldn’t quite believe I’d made it entirely from scratch. I’m not sure if my version is entirely authentic, but it tastes delicious and I’d happily eat bowl after bowl.

Are you a fan of cooking Asian food? What’s your go-to recipe?

Recipe: Vegan Keralan Curry with Cauliflower, Chickpeas & Pineapple

This is one of my all-time favourite curry recipes – full of fragrant flavours, packed with nutrients and veggies, and (best of all!) ready in around half an hour. It’s adapted from one of Jamie’s 15 Minute Meals, though I don’t have the equipment nor the brain speed to make it in that time.

This is a pretty typical Keralan Curry, although I make no claims that it is authentic. It is lighter and fresh in flavour, and more vibrant in texture than a North Indian curry – and as such it is less complex to make. It does need a couple of spices that might not be in everyone’s cupboard, but actually we find that we do use these quite often in curries.

And if you fancy skipping the vegan/veggie element, this curry sauce is amazing made with prawns or white fish – though I’d fry off an onion or a couple of shallots for a bit more texture. I’m also tempted to play around with different veggies, I can imagine it would be delicious with some sweet potato!

Recipe – 2 dinner portions plus 2 lunches, or 3 for dinner (easily scaled up, we’ve made for 8 before)

  • ½ cauliflower
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • Drizzle of vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 2 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • 2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 handful of dried curry leaves
  • 7 cm piece of ginger
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 6 spring onions
  • 1 fresh red chilli
  • 1 big bunch of fresh coriander
  • 1 tin coconut milk
  • 1 tin (400g) chickpeas
  • 1 tin (227g) pineapple in juice
  • 1 lemon

Remove the outer leaves from the cauliflower, then chop into small chunks and place on a baking tray. Drizzle with a little vegetable oil, then roast at 180C for around 10-15 minutes, or until lightly charred and starting to go tender.

Melt the coconut oil in a large pan, then quickly stir in the mustard and fenugreek seeds, turmeric and curry leaves. Peel the ginger and garlic , and trim the spring onions. Pulse these, together with the chilli and coriander stalks in a food processor (I used a mini chopper) until they form a rough pasta, then stir into the spices. Add the coconut milk, drained chickpeas and the pineapple chunks (plus the juice from the pineapple).

When the cauliflower is cooked as above, add this to the curry and bring the whole thing to a boil for a few minutes. Season to taste, adding in around half the juice of the lemon. Serve sprinkled with the coriander leaves, alongside rice – I love it with brown basmati.

This has become such a staple in our house, it’s perfect for a Meatfree Monday meal, and is also great for lunches throughout the week. I can imagine it would be perfect if you’ve got a cold too, with the chilli and ginger being perfect for perking you up. Definitely one we’ll be making again and again throughout the year!

What’s your favourite vegan recipe?