Recipe: Popcorn Rocky Road [AD – gifted]

If I had to choose a favourite TV snack it would be popcorn. Bite-sized, not *too* messy and all too easy to eat a big bowlful whilst watching something trashy, to me it’s the perfect ingredient for a girls night-in with Mean Girls, a solo evening with some Disney classics, or a date-night binge-watching our current favourite (right now it’s Blown Away on Netflix – a little like Bake Off, but with Glass Blowing). And of course it’s absolutely obligatory to purchase an extra-large box when you go to the cinema, right?! Given my love for popcorn you can imagine my response when Popcorn Shed got in touch and offered to send me some goodies to use in a recipe.

 photo Popcorn Rocky Road_zpsibsgkcwv.jpgMade to a secret family recipe (and dear me, I’d love that recipe!) their popcorn comes in sharing boxes or snack bags which are perfectly portioned for lunchboxes or to control calories if, like me, you struggle to stop eating the stuff. It’s all natural ingredients and the variety of flavours is pretty good – there’s some cheesy savoury ones (I’m not a huge fan of these personally, but I’m a sweet popcorn gal anyway) and loaddssss of chocolately and nutty ones. My personal favourite is the Berry-licious – dark chocolate and raspberry is SUCH a good combo.

 photo Popcorn Rocky Road 4_zpsxuzcxqcg.jpg photo Popcorn Rocky Road 9_zpspwsok4tu.jpg photo Popcorn Rocky Road 15_zpsnsrrfjx7.jpgMuch as I wanted to just eat the stuff, I did manage to come up with a “recipe.” And recipe is in inverted commas because this is SO easy I struggle to think of it as a recipe at all. It’s quite a dangerous recipe as it takes no time at all and, after some tortuorous chilling, you have an amazing snack – it’s perfect for work bake sales or taking along to an event. I actually made one for a Youth Group social and it went down *extremely* well. I’m now adored by members as they loved it so much! Easy to make and a crowd pleaser, what’s not to love?!

I prefer a chunkier rocky road, more crumbly with biscuits and other treats but if you prefer a firmer, more chocolately one I’d suggest upping the quantities of chocolate and butter.

 photo Popcorn Rocky Road 8_zpswnlfdbmq.jpg photo Popcorn Rocky Road 12_zpsnirsq5sl.jpg photo Popcorn Rocky Road 14_zps7udxawbm.jpgRecipe – makes 16 generous squares

  • 200g Rich Tea biscuits
  • 150g butter
  • 250g dark chocolate
  • 2 tbsp golden syrup
  • 100g mini marshmallows (be sure to find vegetarian ones if needed)
  • 100g popcorn

Place 200g digestive biscuits in a freezer bag and bash with a rolling pin until broken up. You want some dust and some larger pieces, but nothing more than bite-sized.

In a large saucepan melt the butter, dark chocolate and golden syrup over a gentle heat, stirring constantly until there are no lumps of chocolate or butter visible, then remove from the heat and allow to cool. Once cool add the biscuits, marshmallows and popcorn and stir until everything is covered.

Tip the mixture into a 18cm square baking tin (greased and lined), and spread it out to the corners whilst pushing it down. Chill for at least 2 hours then cut in 16 squares.

 photo Popcorn Rocky Road 16_zpsembuc1iu.jpg photo Popcorn Rocky Road 13_zpsatjbsbgo.jpg photo Popcorn Rocky Road 11_zpsknby80oe.jpgThis recipe is so easily adaptable too. Use dairy-free margarine and chocolate (I always use accidentally vegan Bournville anyway), and buy Freedom Mallows and you’ve got a vegan rocky road (without the Popcorn Shed popcorn, as unfortunately that contains dairy). And of course you can adapt to whatever you have… next time I’m going to use the Butterly Nuts flavour and add a little bit of peanut butter to the chocolate when melting – I think this salty-sweet combination will work wonderfully with some pretzels added for extra crunch!

*I was gifted some Popcorn Shed products to come up with a recipe for my blog. There was no payment for this post and all opinions are my own, as always.

Are you are sweet or salted popcorn person?

Recipe: Vegan Chocolate Cake

This year was the year that I planned to do *all* the Easter baking. The first Easter weekend in four years that wasn’t immediately before an exam period, the first time I could actually enjoy the bank holiday without feeling guilty. I wanted to make Hot Cross Buns, bread, fancy-pants lamb dishes, and I had a real desire to make Lemon-y cookies. I managed to do exactly none of that.

 photo Vegan Chocolate Cake_zpsjipcyg4w.jpgI could make excuses (and to be fair, it was too hot to be inside baking over the Bank Holiday weekend!) but in all honesty? I couldn’t be bothered. It was the first time in what felt like a long time that I could truly relax, and I just wanted to sit. To read a book without feeling guilty. Have a bath without taking study notes with me. To binge watch something anything (Fleabag was the series of choice, SO good!). Baking was quite far down on the list, and so this was the only thing that I made.

A birthday cake for my dad, veganised so my sister could enjoy it. Chocolate-y because it was Easter after all. If it hadn’t have been a birthday cake I probably would have decorated with mini-eggs. And, y’ano, vegan.

As far as vegan cakes go, this one is pretty “normal” – there’s no weird substitute ingredients, no flaxseed pretending to be egg. I don’t have anything against those ingredients, but I also don’t tend to find that they necessarily work in the way they are intending, and I find getting them evenly incorporated in to get an even rise quite tricky. So this is pretty basic. Milk and butter swapped out for plant-milk (we used Oatly) and Flora spread. It works. It rises (to the point we did have to prise one layer off the over rack above). It’s light and airy and tasty. The buttercream is rich and chocolately and indulgent. Even better was this stayed fresh (covered with an upturned salad bowl…) for a good few days, which I was quite impressed by. My only criticism is that it was super-crumbly and so virtually impossible to slice neatly.

 photo Vegan Chocolate Cake 18_zpspwtpjlky.jpg photo Vegan Chocolate Cake 13_zpsc3boeqhz.jpgIngredients (makes an 8 inch sponge, giving 10 generous slices)

  • 300ml vegan milk
  • 1 tbsp white vinegar (we used apple cider as that’s what was lying around)
  • 150g vegan spread (we used Flora)
  • 60g golden syrup
  • 1 tsp instant coffee
  • 275g plain flour
  • 170g sugar
  • 4 tbsp cocoa powder (we used raw cacao powder)
  • 2.5 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • For enough frosting for the middle/top – 75g vegan spread (again, Flora worked fine), 180g icing sugar, 4 tbsp cocoa powder, 2 tbsp vegan milk

Stir the vinegar into the milk and set aside, stirring every so often. Some plant milks will thicken and slightly curdle which is fine (this is the same as turning dairy milk into buttermilk) however oat milk is unlikely to do this! In a pan over a low heat, melt the spread, golden syrup and coffee granules together. I added a tiny splash of boiling water to encourage the coffee to dissolve. Along to cool slightly, then stir in the milk mixture.

Weigh the flour, cocoa, sugar, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) into a large mixing bowl and whisk together – whisking will incorporate some air without the need for sifting.  Gradually pour the milk and melted margarine mixture over the flour mixture and stir well until it becomes a smooth batter.

Divide the mixture between two greased and line sandwich tins (8 inches in diameter) and bake for around 30 minutes or until an inserted skewer comes out clean. I found that these did crack a little, but as you’re piling on the buttercream it doesn’t matter!

Allow the cakes to cool completely on a wire rack before making the buttercream. Beat the spread in a bowl until soft and creamy, then add in half of the icing sugar and beat until smooth. Add the rest of the icing sugar and the cocoa powder and beat until smooth and thick, then gradually beat in up to 2 tbsp of milk (you may not need it all) until the icing is a soft and spreadable consistency. Spread over the top of one cake, sandwich the other on top, and spread the rest of the icing on top. If you want to add icing on the sides, I’d multiply all of the buttercream ingredients by 1.5(ish).
 photo Vegan Chocolate Cake 3_zpsatde0rhb.jpg

Did you do any baking over the Bank Holiday weekend? Are there any other vegan bakes you’d like to see?

Recipe: Cheat’s Chocolate Mousse

One of my all-time favourite desserts is a chocolate mouse. My go-to recipe involves Mars Bars, but the one I’m writing about today is super-simple, super-quick and a total cheat. There’s no separating and whisking of eggs. There’s no melting chocolate. It doesn’t have to be left to set for hours, though does benefit from a session chillin’ in the fridge.

 photo Cheats Chocolate Mousse_zpstugauofq.jpgBasically, grab a pot of cream from the corner shop and you can make an impromptu chocolate mousse providing you, like me, keep some hot chocolate powder in the house. I favour a Swiss brand, Caotina Original (this isn’t a sponsored post btw!) as it’s ridiculously chocolately and indulgent without being over rich. We bulk by it each time we visit Switzerland, or get friends who visit to grab us a pack.

 photo Cheats Chocolate Mousse 8_zpsizvmvvki.jpgRecipe – generously serves 2-3

  • 300ml double cream
  • 6 heaped tsp of hot chocolate powder, or more to taste

First up, whip your cream into soft peaks. I find the best texture is achieved by hand, but you could use a stand mixer or electric hand whisk if you want. Once whipped, sift over the hot chocolate powder and gently fold through to combine, being careful not to knock any air out. Chill until ready to serve.

And that’s it! This cheat’s chocolate mousse, made with no-eggs and just hot chocolate powder, is so ridiculously easy. In fact, it’s dangerously easy as it’s all too quick and simple to make if you fancy a treat!
 photo Cheats Chocolate Mousse 1_zpsbfx7jyi0.jpg

What’s your go-to dessert?

Recipe: White Chocolate & Pretzel Cookies

These were dreamed up early on a Saturday morning. W was snoozing in bed, I was flicking through recipe books. I wanted to back, but I didn’t know what I wanted to bake. It had to be portable, as it was being dragged halfway across London to a BBQ. It needed to be quick and fairly easy, as I’m impatient. It needed to involve minimum baking time, as it’s far too hot in the UK right now to have your oven on for hours on end.

 photo White Choc amp Pretzel Cookies_zpsbyvwl3aj.jpg photo White Chocolate and Pretzel Cookies 25_zpsut9uyxfd.jpgCookies seemed like the obvious choice. But we *always* make cookies. And sure our cookies are delicious, but I wanted something new. Something different. Something a little unusual.

And so White Chocolate & Pretzel Cookies were born. A combination of creamy sweet white chocolate with a crunchy and salty hit from the pretzels, they skyrocketed straight into my top-cookie-spot. The sweet and salty flavours together go so well in the chewy cookie base, with the pretzels adding an amazing texture. I clearly wasn’t the only person who was a massive fan, as the 28 we took to the BBQ disappeared far too quickly, leaving only two left for us to enjoy the next day. Whoops. Basically, make a big batch.

 photo White Chocolate and Pretzel Cookies 21_zpsskyfiraa.jpg photo White Chocolate and Pretzel Cookies 23_zpswcscdcpf.jpgRecipe, makes roughly 30 large cookies (we used the same base recipe as we do for all of our cookies, it just works so well!)

  • 250g butter
  • 220g caster sugar
  • 250g soft dark brown sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 415g plain flour
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 tbsp hot water (plus a little more if needed)
  • 1 pinch of sea salt
  • 250g white chocolate – chopped into big chunks
  • 150g pretzels – roughly crushed, plus some whole ones for the top

Beat the butter slightly until soft, them cream together with the two types of sugar. Crack the eggs into a separate bowl and gradually beat into the butter/sugar mix. Mix the bicarbonate of soda with the warm water, before adding to the mix along with the salt. Stir in the flour, followed by the chocolate and pretzels. Drop large spoonfuls (we used tablespoons) of the mix onto lined baking trays and roughly roll into a ball. Top each with a pretzel, pressing down lightly (don’t flatten). These cookies spread quite a lot, so avoid putting more than 5 or so on a tray.

Bake for around for 10 minutes at 180C, and allow to cool a little before transferring to a white rack to cool as much as you can bear before eating. I find these are perfect served with a glass of ice cold milk – cliched as it may be, but I do love milk and cookies!
 photo White Chocolate and Pretzel Cookies 14_zps3tttriaa.jpg

Are you a fan of sweet and salted foods?

 

Recipe: Chocolate Crinkle Cookies

Just before Christmas I wanted a quick and easy cookie recipe. Something that looked special, tasted amazing and was reasonably “wintery” or festive looking. Something that meant mince pie haters (ahem, me) wouldn’t feel left out at a mulled wine and mince pie gathering. I found a recipe for Chocolate Crinkle Cookies, tweaked it a bit and came up with these beauties.

Chocolatey without being too rich, soft and chewy, and so pretty to look at. They were perfect, easy to make (if not overly quick due to needing a spell in the fridge), and went down so, so well. They also kept for a good few days in an airtight container – I originally made around 80 and not unsurprisingly we couldn’t quite eat them all straight away! As an added bonus the rolled dough, without the icing sugar dusting, froze well too. I’d recommend defrosting slightly before coating and baking.

Recipe – for around 25 cookies, easy to divide and multiply

  • 2 1/3 cups granulated sugar
  • 1⁄4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1⁄4 cup cocoa, unsweetened
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • pinch salt
  • 1/2 cup icing sugar, for rolling

In a bowl, stir together sugar and oil before blending in the cocoa powder – I find it best to do this gradually as it can go a little lumpy. Beat in egg (again, I do this gradually) followed by the vanilla and salt. Sift over the flour and baking powder, then folder the mix together. Note that the mix will be a lot more fudge-like that normal cookie dough! Pop the dough into the fridge for at least two hours.

Use teaspoons to scoop out portions of the mix, then roll into balls (they should be around 1 inch in diameter). Roll each ball in the icing sugar until fully coated, then place on a baking sheet lined with greaseproof paper. As these cookies spread, I’d avoid putting them too close together! Bake the cookies in batches at 175 for around 11-13 minutes – they will look gooey in between the cracks, but should firm up when cooled. Allow to cool for 5 minutes on the trays, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Enjoy at any time of the day – we made have had these as a cheeky breakfast on my sister’s birthday!

What’s your current favourite cookie recipe?

Recipe: Freezer Chocolate-Chunk Cookies

This post comes with a safety warning – do not read if you lack self-control.

 photo Cookies_zpsu63tirlo.jpgBecause having freshly-based cookies available with around 10 minutes notice is a bad, bad thing if you’re trying to get into the ‘slimming’ outfit you bought for a wedding. It turns out I have zero self-control when it comes to these cookies, though it’s not surprising. These are thinner cookies (for UK readers, they’re more Millie’s than Ben’s), chewy on the outside but softer within, and packed absolutely full with chocolate.

I blame exams on the fact that these disappeared unreasonably quickly – two study days a week plus the stress of an impending exam means any kind of sweet treat isn’t going to last long! And (I say defensively) with a stand-mixer it’s all too easy to just whip up another batch whilst on a break from pricing models and credibility theory…

 photo Ultimate Choc Chunk Cookies 11_zpsxafi791w.jpg photo Ultimate Choc Chunk Cookies 12_zpsmhiia8ls.jpgRecipe (makes lots of cookies, on the last bake we got 39 plus plenty of raw cookie dough)

  • 250g butter
  • 220gcaster sugar
  • 250g soft dark brown sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 415g plain flour
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 tbsp hot water (plus a little more if needed)
  • 1 pinch of sea salt
  • 400g chocolate – here we used a mix of milk and white chocolate (just cheap bars, roughly chopped into chunks)

The dough takes mere minutes to  whip up in a kMix*! Beat the butter slightly until soft, them cream together with the two types of sugar. Crack the eggs into a separate bowl and gradually beat into the butter/sugar mix. Mix the bicarbonate of soda with the warm water, before adding to the mix along with the salt. Stir in the flour and chocolate. Drop large spoonfuls (we used tablespoons) of the mix onto lined baking trays and roughly roll into a ball.

If you’re baking them straight away, pop into the fridge for around 10-15 minutes to firm up before baking for 10 minutes at 180C. If you’re freezing them, freeze on the tray for an hour or so, before removing and freezing in a resealable bag. Bake from frozen for around 12 minutes at 180C.

 photo Ultimate Choc Chunk Cookies 9_zpsvpu4ua8t.jpg photo Ultimate Choc Chunk Cookies 10_zpsqngvkgbm.jpgObviously, you don’t have to make chocolate cookies (though why wouldn’t you?!). What I do recommend is switching out some of the chocolate for other ingredients – we’ve tried nuts (peanuts are especially good if you add a blob of peanut butter to the dough), crystallized ginger and even adding a spot of chopped chilli in. Next on my list is an adaption of these Beer & Bacon Cookies

Are you a cookie fan? Do you think you’d have the self-control to keep a batch in the freezer?!

Review: Choccywoccydoodah Bar du Chocolat, Brighton

I mentioned in a recent foodie round-up that I’d finally managed to try Choccywoccydoodah in Brighton – and I alluded to the fact that it didn’t disappoint. In fact it far exceeded my expectations.

 photo Choccywoccydoodah_zpsqd1ojbgu.jpgAdmittedly my expectations were low to begin with. I’d always thought of it as a tourist trap. A bit tacky. Too much sugar-craft and poor ingredients. Expensive and tasteless. I’m happy to admit I was wrong on all accounts. Well, maybe it is a bit tacky, but in a good way.

The shop, in particular downstairs, really showcases the cake-decorating talent of the team. From someone who can’t ice to save her life, I was so, so impressed. There is also a range of wedding cakes to browse,perfect for a budding bride – although I’m sure they cost far more than our cake budget! Still, a girl can dream…

We weren’t there to wedding plan though. Nope, for us it was all about the chocolate! We headed up to their little cafe upstairs and surprisingly got seated straight away. There was a queue pretty much throughout our stay though, so go prepared to wait! Service was quick and friendly until we were nearly finished. We got presented with our receipt (without asking – but it felt a bit like a hint), but we waited for a good 10 minutes with our purses out before having to head up to the counter to pay. Still, at least I got to gawp at the massive 6+ layer chocolate cakes!

 photo Choccywoccydoodah Brighton 9_zpsygc7zyk0.jpg photo Choccywoccydoodah Brighton 7_zps9hptap4t.jpg photo Choccywoccydoodah Brighton 4_zpso9yubtie.jpgAll 3 of us ordered a chocolate dipping pot each (a mistake – 2 between 3 would have been plenty!). We all went for milk, though I wish I’d been brave enough to go for dark. Served with marshmallows, honeycomb, rocky road, coconut madeleines, strawberries, shortbread and some kind of fudge cake it was huge. The milk chocolate was delicious, though I think dark would have cut through the sweetness a little better. The only poor point on the plate was the honeycomb, being a little too chewy and lacking crunch.

The chocolate was (surprisingly to me) oh-so-good. Creamy, rich, just the right amount of sweetness and with a lovely deep cocoa taste. By far one of the best milk chocolates I’ve tried in a while!

 photo Choccywoccydoodah Brighton 3_zps7wb2viev.jpgBeing the greedy piglet I am, I also ordered a praline milkshake. I ask for it without chocolate; a good shout as it was light and refreshing. By far and away the best milkshake I’ve had. Next time though? I’m definitely trying the cake!

Have you ever been to Choccywoccydoodah? What did you think?

Recipe: Chocolate Beetroot Loaf Cake

This is my all-time favourite chocolate cake recipe. I find most chocolate cakes too cakey, too dry, not chocolate-y enough. And whilst I love brownies, sometimes I want something lighter. This is the perfect in-between. Rich with a deep chocolate flavour, moist, but light enough to eat with a cuppa.

 photo Beetroot Loaf_zpsfuiuq3of.jpgPlus the fact that it contains beetroot makes me feel a little healthier. Sure, it’s still just oil, sugar, chocolate and a bit of veg – but at least it’s got the veg right?! Having said that, I just it as an excuse to demolish most of the loaf in just two days so perhaps not the best way of thinking…

It’s super-simple to whip up – just a case of blitz-ing the beetroot, melting some butter, mixing it all together and throwing in a tin with some chocolate chips. However I’m lazy, the mix is super-thick and it can split if you don’t add the oil gradually. Rather than give up, I just shove it in my new Kenwood Stand Mixer* which means I can literally have this in the oven in under ten minutes. Washing up included. It’s rather dangerous on study days when I’m bored and peckish!

 photo Chocolate Beetroot Loaf Cake 4_zpsnzk1kzub.jpg photo Chocolate Beetroot Loaf Cake 6_zpsf4lbb2f7.jpgIngredients

  • 1/2 vac-pack of beetroot (around 150g), roughly chopped. Use the rest to make a risotto or delicious salad!
  • 200g plain flour
  • 100g cocoa powder
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 250g sugar
  • 3 medium eggs
  • 175ml sunflower oil
  • 100g dark chocolate – either a bar chopped roughly, or chips

Blitz the beetroot in a food processor until you have a rough puree, then tip into a mixing bowl with a pinch of salt. Add rest of the ingredients, except the oil and chocolate, and mix. When combined (it’s a thick mixture, so using a stand mixture makes it easier – though doing it by hand = extra calories burnt = more cake), add the oil gradually whilst continually stirring. Once the oil has been added, stir through the chocolate and tip into a lined 900g loaf tin. Pop in the oven and bake for around 50 minutes at 190C (stick a skewer in – if it comes out gooey the cake needs a little longer!). Leave the loaf to cool on a rack before slicing.

 photo Chocolate Beetroot Loaf Cake 3_zps6ghbw5yy.jpgI like to serve it with a spoon of natural yoghurt and some raspberries (it makes the perfect lazy brunch!), but it’s also so, so good just on it’s own. Bonus if it’s slightly warm and melty too…

*I was gifted a kMix Stand Mixer as part of a baking collaboration with Kenwood. All opinions are my own – I really love cake, and I really love things that make baking cake easier!

What’s your favourite chocolate cake recipe?

Recipe: Baked Cinnamon Doughnuts

This is a recipe I really, really wish I hadn’t discovered. This is not the way I wanted to start recipes posts of 2017.

 photo Baked Cinnamon Doughnuts_zpslmuhqtrz.jpgI wanted to start with a good fresh salad, or a zingy stir-fry. Something colourful, healthy, crisp, full of nutrients. Instead I’m posting about dougnuts. Which I absolutely insist must be dunked into Nutella. I’m sorry.

Don’t get me wrong, these are delicious. But my greedy tummy does not need to know that I can whip up doughnuts in just half an hour, with storecupboard ingredients. It makes Friday-night Movie-nights all the more gluttonous. And all the more yummy. That said, these are oven-baked. No frying. No oil. That’s got to count for something, right?!

Soft and moist, spiced with warmth from cinnamon, I like these dipped into a melted pot of Nutella. There’s just something so magical about the combination of chocolate, hazelnut and cinnamon; I could eat them all day.

 photo Baked Cinnamon Doughnuts 7_zpseecdwzej.jpg photo Baked Cinnamon Doughnuts 15_zpsr20jyy93.jpgIngredients

  • 225g plain flour
  • 200g sugar (I like to use a combination of caster and light brown sugar in these)
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 egg
  • 300ml milk
  • 25g butter, melted

Mix together the flour, sugars, baking powder, and cinnamon. In another bowl, whisk together the egg, milk, and melted butter. Stir the wet mixture into the dry ingredients until combined – but be careful not to overmix! Spoon or pipe the batter into dounght pans (I used silicone ones – if you have regular ones then grease them lightly first), filling each one a little more than three-quarters full.

Bake for 10 minutes at 180C, or until firm to the touch and light golden. Allow to cool for a few minutes, then carefully remove from the pan – I found my first batch tore quite a bit due to not letting them cool enough, so be patient!

 photo Baked Cinnamon Doughnuts 11_zpsziiiud0z.jpgIf you want to be ultra-indulgent (and let’s face it, if you’re making brownies you might as well go hard or go home…), I recommend covering in a cinnamon-spiked sugar. Melt 6 tablespoons of butter in an 8-inch saute pan. Combine 150g sugar and plenty of cinnamon in a small bowl. Dip each doughnut first in the butter and then in the cinnamon sugar. Dip into Nutella. Eat. Done.

Have you ever made doughnuts? What have you been eating recently?

Recipe: S’mores Brownies

Yup, S’mores brownies. I’ll pause for a second to let that sink in.

smores-browniesS’mores brownies. Super fudgy chocolate brownies (with milk chocolate chips, because chocolate), baked on a digestive biscuit crust and topped with toasted mini marshmallows.

S’mores have been a major love of mine since my Girl Guide days. Contrary to popular belief, we never went camping camping, and our weekly base was in the town centre. That didn’t stop us having fire pits in the church-hall courtyard, and s’mores always made an appearance. We tended to go for the easy option of setting fire to toasting marshmallows and sandwiching between chocolate-covered digestive biscuits, though I’ve since discovered that spreading digestives with nutella is a rather delicious alternative. These brownies pretty much recreate those s’mores, but in a bigger and slightly more convenient way for eating in a ladylike fashion.

 photo Smores Brownie 3_zpsblhgp7ea.jpg photo Smores Brownie 6_zpsvzlee95q.jpgI was originally invited by The Co-Op to do some spooky Halloween-themed baking, but a migraine put an end to that so we compromised on Bonfire Bakes instead – just as well as the marshmallows instead the box were crying out for a flame and some chocolate. With the inclusion of a free-from brownie mix, we set about recreating one of our favourite Autumnal treats.

The buttery biscuit base of these s’more brownies  is crispy and crumbly – and the flakes of sea salt running through (which was originally a total accident, I meant to grab the finely milled stuff) break things up, stopping it from being too sweet. Whilst we used a mix for the brownie layer, you could easily use any of your favourite recipes (even lighten it up with my lower-fat mayonnaise brownies – old post alert!). Last year W first created a s’more brownie and added a good measure of whisky to the brownies before baking, definitely worth a try… You underbake the brownies, even more so than usual, popping a good layer of mashmallows and then baking for a few minutes longer. If you liked the scorched effect, pop under the grill or a blowtorch for a few seconds too. Yum.

 photo Smores Brownie 1_zpshdmpguq3.jpg photo Smores Brownie 19_zpskt1ljroc.jpgIngredients

  • For the crust: 5 tablespoons unsalted butter, 8 digestives, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1/3 teaspoon sea salt flakes
  • For the brownies: use your favourite recipe designed for a 20cm square pan
  • A bag of mini marshmallows (around 100-150g)

To make the crust: Preheat the oven to 160°C and line an 20x20cm pan. Melt the butter in a small pan. Crush the biscuits (I find using a mini food processor the quickiest and tidiest way, though bashing with a rolling pin will always be a great stress reliever!), then mix with the sugar and salt. Pour in the melted butter and stir until well combined. Pour into the lined pan, and press evenly along the bottom and sides – the amounts here make for quite a thin base, but increase the proportions if you want more of a crunch. Bake for around 18-20 minutes until lightly golden and staring to crisp. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly.

To make the brownies: Increase the oven temperature to 180°C and prepare the brownie layer. As I said, we were lazy and used a mix but just go for your favourite recipe, adding whisky if you fancy. Pour the batter over the crust and spread out evenly. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes depending on how gooey you like your brownies.

To make the marshmallow layer: Leave the oven on. Arrange the marshmallows over the top of the part-baked brownies. Continue to bake for 5 or so minutes, until the marshmallows are melted and light brown on top and the brownies are cooked to your liking. If you fancy the more charred marshmallow taste, grill or blowtorch for another minute. Just be careful if blowtorching – a quote from W: “I didn’t notice it was on fire…”

 photo Smores Brownie 13_zps3hwewmjj.jpg photo Smores Brownie 10_zpscwioytzb.jpgThese really are utterly delicious – sweet, sticky and insanely moreish. We’ve pretty much decided that making these will become a little bit of a Bonfire night tradition, as will wrapping them up and taking them with us to watch a local fireworks display. S’mores brownies. I want s’more right now…

What’s your favourite Autumnal treat? Did you celebrate Bonfire Night?