Food: 5 Frittatas for Lunchboxes

One of my go-to lunchbox fillers is a frittata. High in protein from the eggs, they are super filling and can be completely adjusted to your tastes. Whether you want them to be lightened up and full of healthier ingredients, or go all out indulgent with plenty of cheese and potato, a frittata works well! They can also be pretty budget friendly, using up all the odds and ends in your fridge – although of course you could make the mother of all frittatas and add in some spendy ingredients such as smoked salmon…

I tend to have my go-to ‘base’ recipe for making a frittata, honed after far too many that were burnt on the botton, too solid, too liquidy, frittatas that were solid enough to use as a weapon, frittatas that fell apart before they even got to the office. You’ll need an oven-proof frying pan (mine is around 21 cm) for these recipes, though you could possibly oven-bake the whole thing in a dish.

Base Recipe (I usually cut the frittata into 3, unless it’s particularly carb/cheese heavy)

  • 1 tbsp butter (around 15g) or 1 tbsp oil
  • 6 eggs
  • 50ml milk

Generally, I’ll fry all my filling ingredients lightly in the oil/butter, before beating together the eggs, milk and parmesan with plenty of pepper and adding to the pan. I’ll keep on the hob for around 5 minutes on a low heat, then oven cook at 200C for 8-12 minutes or until cooked.

Potato, Shallot & Mozzarella

This is comfort food at it’s finest, and it’s blimmin’ delish! It’s from a fairly recent edition of Delicious Magazine so I can’t link it, but essentially sliced potatoes are fried until golden (around 20 minutes) with some sliced shallots and garlic added for the final few minutes. Eggs and milk are then added with parmesan mixed in, then mozzarella is nestled on top. Before oven-cooking a little more parmesan is sprinkled on top. Best served with a big salad as this one is super hearty!

Kale, Red Onion & Feta

This is my go-to low carb option, inspired by this BBCGoodFood recipe. Simply fry 2 red onions in a little oil until soft (I sometimes add a pinch on dried thyme), before adding around 3 handfuls of shredded kale. Stir fry for a couple of minutes, then add 2tbsp of balsamic and plenty of seasoning. Add your egg/milk mixture (I usually add 8 eggs for this one), then allow to cook on the hob for 5 minutes. Sprinkle generously with some crumbled feta, then bake for around 10 minutes.

Chorizo, Potato, Red Pepper & Feta

This is perfect picnic food, and my favourite way of using up leftover new potatoes (I always cook too many!). Simply fry some cubed chorizo in a dry pan until it releases its oils. Add some sliced cooked new potatoes, and try until starting to crisp slightly. Throw some roasted red pepper in, stir to combine, then add in your egg/milk mixture with some paprika (around 1/4 tsp). Cook for 5 minutes on the hob, then sprinkle with plenty of feta and bake for around 10 minutes. It’s also cook spiced up with some chopped chilli…

You can find my full recipe here.

Onion Bhaji

This one is the only one which I don’t think lasts quite as long – the others will happily sit in the fridge for 3 or 4 days, but this one does tend to go a bit grey after the second day. I’m thinking about making individual muffins instead so I can halve the recipe, but it’s not quite working out… Follow the recipe here, but I reduce the potato a little and add 1/2 tsp each of ground cumin, coriander, and turmeric as well as the curry powder.

Spaghetti, Spinach, Courgette & Pesto

This is my new favourite – so yum! It’s super filling so I usually only manage a quarter of it in my lunchbox with some extra salad, which makes it pretty thrifty. It’s slightly more mess-making than the others as it involves a couple of stages, but it’s well worth it.

First off, cook 150g spaghetti until just al dente (around 8 minutes). Drain and run under the cold tap to cool before setting aside. Blanch some spinach (I use 3 handfuls) by placing in a sieve and pouring over boiling water. Run under the cold tap to cool, then squeeze out the excess liquid and add to the spaghetti. Coarsely grate 2 medium courgettes, and squeeze out the excess water. Fry for 5 minutes with a little olive oil and 1 sliced garlic clove. Discard the garlic and add the courgette to the spaghetti/spinach along with 2 tsp of pesto. Stir together well. Meanwhile beat together the 6 eggs and 50ml milk with plenty of black pepper and 50g parmesan. Add this to the spaghetti and vegetables and use your hands to mix well. Melt a little butter in an oven proof frying pan, then add the egg-pasta mixture. Cook for 5 or so minutes until set on bottom, sprinkle with extra parmesan, then back until cooked. Yum!

What’s your go-to lunchbox filler?

Recipe: Nutella Brioche Rolls for a Weekend Breakfast

One of the things we still try and do, though admittedly not every weekend, is to treat ourselves to a good treat breakfast at home. Whether it’s a good old-fashioned fry-up, a stack of American pancakes with half a jug of maple syrup or something more adventurous (Green Shakshuka is a favourite), it’s one of my favourite times of the week. Dedicated time in the kitchen, then a lazy few minutes with my other half to catch up with each other, find out about the other’s week and generally enjoy some time together.

These Nutella Brioche Rolls are perfect for such a breakfast.

They’re also great for weekday breakfasts, or travelling breakfasts, or indeed any breakfast. They freeze well are are delicious cold or reheated in the oven. I love them! I find they are best served warm with a glass of cold milk, but they are equally good on the go. And of course, don’t be scared to be generous with the nutella…

Recipe (Makes 8)

  • 350g strong white flour, plus extra for dusting
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 35g sugar
  • 8g yeast
  • 100ml milk, slightly warmed
  • 3 medium eggs
  • 100g very soft butter
  • 4 heaped tbsp Nutella

Unfortunately this is a two-day process, and it’s far easier made in a stand-mixer (I *hate* making enriched bread doughs by hand, toooooo sticky). However it’s well worth the results. To make the brioche, pop the flour in the bowl of a stand mixer and add the salt, sugar and yeast. Add the milk and the eggs and mix together with the dough hook on a slow speed. Once all bound together, increase the speed to medium and knead for 5 or so minutes. Gradually add the butter, whilst still kneading, until the dough is elastic and the butter is well incorporated. Pop the dough into a clean bowl, cover with clingfilm and chill overnight.

The following morninge, knock back the dough by flattening it with the palm of your hand. Divide it into 8 equal weighted balls, then on a lightly oiled surface roll each one out to a rectangle about 8 x 16cm and 4mm thick.

Soften the Nutella, if needed, by gently warming it, then spread ½ tablespoon over each piece of dough, leaving a slight border all around. Roll up from one long side to make a “swiss roll”, then cut along the length of the sausage (I find a very sharp knife is needed!), leaving it still attached at one end. Twist and spiral the 2 pieces around each other, so that the Nutella is visible, then press the ends together to form a roll. Put onto a lined baking sheet. Cover loosely with greased clingfilm and prove for 45 minutes or so. Brush the rolls with a little milk, then back for 20 minutes at 180C. Cool slightly on a wire rack before serving with a glass of milk.

I imagine these would also be lovely with some strawberries on the side!

What’s your go-to weekend brunch option?

Recipe: Chipotle Sweetcorn Fritters for Breakfast, Brunch or Lunch

I’m forever looking for quick recipes, made with mainly storecupboard ingredients, that can be made during my study day lunches. They need to be speedy (as otherwise I spend half my day procrastinating in the kitchen), reasonably light (to avoid inducing a full-bellied nap), ideally healthy, and (of course) nice and tasty!

These Sweetcorn Fritters fit the bill nicely.

Super quick to make, super tasty and satisfying to eat, and the toppings can be varied week to week so I never get bored. We generally have all of the ingredients to hand so it doesn’t require a trip to the shops (if you don’t have soured cream you could use creme fraiche or yoghurt, or even a small splash of milk), and it doesn’t make me feel like a post-lunch rest on the sofa. It also makes a great weekend breakfast!

Recipe (serves 1 generously)

  • 40g plain flour
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 2 tbsp soured cream
  • ½ tsp chipotle paste (or a pinch of dried chilli flakes)
  • 1 handful frozen sweetcorn, defrosted
  • 2 spring onions, finely diced
  • 1-2 tbsp oil, for frying

Mix together the flour and baking powder in a bowl, and make a well in the centre. Gradually add the egg and soured and mix to a smooth batter. Stir in the chipotle paste, sweetcorn and spring onions, and season well with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a large frying pan until hot, then add spoonfuls (2 tbsp seems to make good sizes fritters) of the mixture. Cook for 2-3 minutes each side, until crisp and golden, and keep warm in the oven. Serve hot, with whatever accompaniments you fancy.

In these photos I served with some Chipotle Slaw (it was the day after we ate Fish Finger Tacos, so I stirred the leftover dressing into the leftover slaw) and some Pink Pickled Onions, but these are also good served with any combination of feta, bacon, avocado and poached egg. We’ve also eaten something similar in the past with sausages.

What is your go-to lunch dish?

Recipe: Roast Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic

This classic recipe is something I’ve been wanting to make for a while. I’d read about it occasionally in foodie magazines, there’s variations featured in a couple of my cookbooks. But I’ve always been a bit scared to try it. I mean, I love garlic but 40 cloves!? Every part of my brain said it wouldn’t work, but eventually I gathered up the courage and just gave it a go. And I’m sure glad I did!

Instead of being harshly garlicky, the slower simmering of the cloves means the garlic cooks down and becomes sweet and fragrant. The chicken is tender and moist, to the point of falling apart. The sauce is light, yet flavourful. Served with mashed potato (with some of the soft garlic stirred through) and green vegetables, I find this is the perfect summery alternative to a more traditional roast chicken.

Recipe – 1 large chicken would served 5/6 (or gives plenty of leftovers)

  • 5-6 banana shallots peeled and halved lengthways
  • 1 whole chicken
  • ½ lemon
  • 25g butter
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 40 garlic cloves (I used 3 bulbs), unpeeled
  • 1 small glass of white wine
  • 250ml chicken stock (from a cube is fine, homemade is extra yummy)
  • 1 tbsp dried tarragon
  • 1 tbsp crème fraîche

Remove any string from the chicken and place the lemon inside the cavity. Generously season the chicken inside and out with plenty of salt and pepper. Heat the butter and oil in a large flameproof casserole. Brown the chicken over a medium-high heat for a couple of minutes on each side. Add the whole garlic cloves and shallots to the casserole, nestling around the chicken, and poking some of the garlic inside the cavity with the lemon.

Pour over the wine and chicken stock. Cover the casserole with a tight-fitting lid and bring the liquid to a simmer on the hob, then transfer to the oven and cook for 1¼ hours at 200C. Check that the chicken is cooked by piercing the thickest part of the thigh and ensuring the juices are clear.

Transfer the chicken to a warmed plate to rest whilst you make the sauce. Skim off any fat in the casserole pan and discard, then return to the hob and stir in the tarragon and crème fraîche. Squeeze in half of the garlic cloves (reserving the rest for another day, or use in the mashed potato). Bring the sauce to a gentle simmer, stirring, then season to taste and serve alongside the chicken.

Not only does this dish taste delicious, but the cooking smells are insanely good!

Are you a fan of Sunday roasts, or do you like to mix things up a bit?

Recipe: From-Scratch Laksa (Spicy Malaysian Noodle Soup with Chicken, Prawns & Egg)

As part of my foodie goals this year, I really wanted to start eating and cooking more authentic Asian cuisine. My standard stir-fry is all well and good, but I wanted to play with new-to-me ingredients, try new techniques and produce some really exciting dishes. This laksa might not be complicated (though it does create a huge amount of washing up!), but it tastes wonderful.

Generally, laksa is a spicy broth, served over rice noodles with chicken and prawns. I’ve added a little coconut milk to my version, both to temper the spice and also to make it smoother and creamier. I’ve also added a soft-boiled egg, because I’ve come to love the flavour of an oozing egg yolk in spicier foods. The whole thing is sweat-inducingly spicy, and somehow subtly combines sweet, salty and sour notes. It makes for a wonderful Friday night fakeaway, and I know I’ll be making this again and again.

The key to a good laksa, as I’ve discovered, is taking the time to make your own paste. I’ve used ready-prepared ones and they just aren’t quite the same. Yes, it might take a while (both to make and also to hunt down some of the ingredients) but it’s well worth it – and my quantities here make double the amount needed. I’ve frozen it in an ice-cube tray so I can make laksa whenever the mood strikes me.

Oh, and for an even quicker version I have made this using leftover roast chicken and ready cooked prawns. If the paste has been ready-made it’s the perfect quick after-work supper – and it’s wonderful if you’ve got a cold brewing!

This recipe was based on Ping Coobes version in Delicious Magazine. I’ve simplified it a bit based on the ingredients I was able to find – some of them you may need to hunt down in your local Asian supermarket (I specifically struggled finding shrimp paste and galangal).

Recipe for the Laksa Pasta (enough for 4 servings)

  • 1 tsp of dried chilli flakes
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 3 fresh red chillies, roughly chopped
  • 4 shallots, roughly chopped
  • 4 lemongrass stalks, bottom part only, roughly chopped
  • 30g fresh galangal, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 30g fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 tbsp ground turmeric
  • 2 tbsp shrimp paste
  • 25g peanuts
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil

To make the paste, simply whizz all of the ingredients in a food processor until you have a rough paste – add a little extra oil if you need to. I used my mini-chopped and found I had to do it in batches.

Recipe for the Laksa (serves 2)

  • 50g vegetable oil
  • Half quantity of the Laksa pasta, above
  • 2 skinless and boneless chicken thigh fillets
  • Tops of the lemongrass discarded when making the paste
  • Handful of raw prawns
  • 750ml chicken stock
  • 150ml coconut milk
  • 2 nests of dried rice noodles, cooked according to pack instructions
  • Bunch fresh mint, leaves only
  • 1 medium egg, boiled for 5 minutes (soft boiled) or 7 minutes (hard boiled), peeled
  • Handful of peanuts, roughly chopped
  • Lime wedges for garnish

Heat the oil in a wok frying pan over a medium heat. Add the laksa paste and reduce the heat to the lowest setting, and fry for at least 15 minutes, stirring from time to time. I try to fry for 30-40 minutes to really develop the flavour.

Put the chicken in a pan with half of the stock and the lemongrass, then simmer for 15 minutes until cooked through. Remove from the pan and allow to cool before slicing into strips. Add the raw prawns to the stock and cook for 2-3 minutes until cooked, then transfer to the plate with the chicken. Skim off the scum from the surface of the poaching liquid and discard the lemongrass, before adding the rest of the stock and the coconut milk.

Once the paste has cooked, add it to the stock and coconut mixture, and allow to simmer for 15 or so minutes before straining the broth through a sieve. Taste and season if necessary. Bring the broth back to the boil. Portion out the noodles, chicken and prawns into two bowls, and pour the boiling broth over the top. Sprinkle with mint leaves, chopped peanuts and a squeeze of lime, and finish with half of the boiled egg.

As you can probably tell, it does make a huge amount of washing up – but it’s well worth it! The flavours are insanely complex, I couldn’t quite believe I’d made it entirely from scratch. I’m not sure if my version is entirely authentic, but it tastes delicious and I’d happily eat bowl after bowl.

Are you a fan of cooking Asian food? What’s your go-to recipe?

Cooking From: Bolognese Baked Eggs (Toast Hash Roast Mash by Dan Doherty)

The subtitle of this book is “Real Food for Every Time of Day” – it’s the type of food Dan (executive chef of Duck & Waffle) likes to eat at home and, quite frankly, if he eats like this I’d be happy to move in with him tomorrow. This book is basically a book of comfort food under many guises – there’s pancakes, there’s things to top toast with, there’s sweet things, there’s savoury things. Most dishes are designed for breakfast or brunch, but can really be eaten any time of day.

Whilst we haven’t cooked that many dishes out of this book, it’s one we turn to again and again for inspiration. It’s a joy to read, one of those cookbooks that makes you feel cozy and comforted. In fact reading it again for this review made me realise just how many recipes I want to make!

Chapters are On Toast, Eggs, Hash, Eggs Over Easy, Pancakes, Hangover, Savoury, Sides & Salas, Sweets and Drinks. Basically there’s something for anyone, something for every occasion. There’s jams, homemade nutella, cocktails, instructions to make the best pancakes. And recipes I want to try? Around 99% of them! I won’t list every single one, but top of my list? Dan’s take on Egg’s Benedict featuring a saltbeef bagel and mustard hollandaise. It sounds amazing! The recipe for a Black Pudding Hash made with leftover roast potatoes sounds like the stuff of dreams. But it’s the Hangover chapter which really gets me excited. Scotch Bhaji (basically a scotch egg, with runny yolk, encased in an onion bhaji). The Patty Melt, merging a grilled cheese sandwich with a burger. I’m slobbering at the thought.

However it’s an altogether more simpler recipe I’m featuring here today, and one I’ve simplified even more from the book. Taken from the Eggs chapter, this recipe takes bolognese (see my tomato-free bolognese recipe here, but use your favourite), adds heat in the form of harissa, then nestles in lightly poached eggs, covers in cheese and then bakes. The result is a hug in a dish. It’s warming, spicy, gooey from the eggs, and perfect served with a mound of toast or some freshly baked pitta bread.

Recipe (Serves 2)

  • 2 generous portions of bolognese (I’d veer on the side of too much here!)
  • 1 tsp harissa, or more to taste
  • 4 eggs
  • 100g gruyere cheese

Simply heat the bolognese with the harissa until hot. Lightly poach the eggs until they are just firm enough to remove from the water. Spoon the bolognese mixture into a baking dish, nestle in the eggs and sprinkle over the cheese. Bake at 180C for around 5 minutes, or until the cheese is melted. Serve with plenty of bread for dipping.

It may not be in the hangover section, but I’d certainly be prepared to bet that this would  cure any hangover!

Are you a brunch fan? What’s your go-to at home weekend brunch?

Recipe: Lemon & Olive Oil Cake

Despite being a self-confession chocoholic, my go-to flavouring for a cake is lemon. There’s something about a zingy sponge, perhaps filled with a vibrant curd or topped with a crunchy drizzle glaze, that just makes my heart sing and tastebuds dance.

I usually make a lemon drizzle cake (recipe will be coming soon), but this is something a little different. This cake is smarter, it’s perfect for a dinner party dessert served with zest creme fraiche and raspberries, but it’s also delicious with a cup of tea. As it’s not too sweet, I confess I’ve also enjoyed it for a lazy weekend breakfast with some yoghurt! It’s a super moist cake with a tender crumb, a whack of lemony zing and subtle grassy flavours of olive oil.

Speaking of the olive oil, I used Terre Di San Vito*. I’ve been using this olive oil for the past month or two, and I have to say it’s good. It’s grassy and well-flavoured, without being overly harsh at the back of your throat. It makes wonderful salad dressings, and I’ve enjoyed far too much of it served simply with bread and some balsamic vinegar. Yum!

Back to the cake. It’s super simple to make, though does require some careful folding and a decent hand whisk or stand mixer. But really it’s hardly any effort at all, especially as I’ve simplified the method compared to many similar recipes I’d found – this gal ain’t got time for separating eggs and whisking whites and yolks individually!

Recipe (Makes 8 generous slices, 10 more dainty ones)

  • 5 medium eggs
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 120ml extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 1/2 tbsp lemon juice (roughly one lemon)
  • 125g plain flour, sifted
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • Zest of one lemon
  • 50g icing sugar, for dusting

Using stand mixer (you could do it by hand, but you’ll be exhausted afterwards), beat the eggs and sugar on high until the mixture is fluffy and has doubled in volume (it took just over 6 minutes in my KitchenAid). While the eggs and sugar are mixing, in a separate bowl measure the flour, baking powder, salt and lemon zest and whisk together.

Using a spatula, fold in the olive oil and lemon juice into the egg mixture, followed by the flour mixture. Fold until the flour disappears, but be careful not to overmix.

Pour the batter into a greased and lined 9 inch cake tin, and bake for 40-45 minutes at 175C until the top is a light golden brown and a skewed poked in comes out clean. Sift over some icing sugar before serving, to decorate.

Told you it was an easy cake recipe! I find this one is best eaten the day after baking, as it gets slightly more moister and almost sticky as it sits. I think it would be the perfect cake to take along to a summery BBQ…

*I received two bottles of Terre Di San Vito olive oil to promote on my Instagram page. No blog post was required, and all opinions are (as ever!) my own. No money exchanged hands in this collaboration. 

Have you ever tried baking with olive oil?

Recipe: 5-Ingredient Summer Vegetable Pasta with Lemon & Feta

You know me, I love a pasta dish if I’m in need of comfort food. Carbonara, Mac’n’Cheese, a big bowl of no-tomato Bolognese. All perfect comfort foods, but they can be a bit heavy and a bit too much to cook in the summer heat. No-one wants a pan of Bolognese simmering for 2 hours when it’s hot and sunny outside! This pasta dish is the perfect alternative.

The combination of the feta starting to melt into the hot pasta keeps the level of comfort food, yet the abundance of green vegetables and lemony flavours keep it summery. Some of the pasta is replaced with courgette, making the dish lighter, and the slight al dente texture of the peas adds another element.

In short, this is the perfect hot weather comfort food.

Recipe (serves 2)

  • 140g pasta, spaghetti or linguine works well here
  • 2-3 courgettes, peeled into strips with a vegetable peeler
  • 50g peas
  • 1 lemon, zest and juice
  • 25g feta

Cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet, adding the peas for the last 3-4 minutes. Drain, reserving a cup of the cooking water. Meanwhile spread the courgette strips out as much as possible onto a baking tray, season with a little salt and roast for 5-7 minutes at 180C.

Return the pasta and peas to their pan, and add the courgette along with a good grind of black pepper. Toss together, adding a little pasta water, then stir through the zest and juice of the lemon. Keep tossing togethe,r adding more water, until everything is evenly combined. Drizzle with a little olive oil, if you have any to hand, then pile into bowls and crumble over the feta.

A super easy pasta dish with summery flavours, ready in under 15 minutes. Perfect for hot evenings when you just want to be lazing around in the garden!

What’s your go-to pasta dish?

Cooking From: Homemade Pita Bread (James Morton’s Brilliant Bread)

Without a doubt, Brilliant Bread is my most recommended cookbook. It’s the one on my shelves that is well-thumbed, pages stiff with flour, faded with watermarks. If anyone, absolutely anyone, mentions baking their own bread to me I insist they purchase this book. It is quite simply the best book for bread making, both for beginners and beyond.

I could stop with the review and this post there, really, because I quite simply cannot sing James’ praises highly enough.

The writing style is a pleasure to read, it’s a book I can quite happily sit and cosy up with as much as bake from. He has such an excellent way of describing the bread-making process, in a way that’s both easy to understand but also extremely detailed. And the best bit? The majority of the recipes don’t require much, if any, kneading. Bread without having to get my hands dirty is a revelation, and this book alone is the reason I make my own bread so often.

Recipe (I get 10 pittas out of this, as I prefer mine slightly smaller, I quite often quarter or halve too for a small batch)

  • 200g strong white flour
  • 200g plain white flour
  • 8g salt
  • 8g yeast
  • 275g tepid water
  • flavourless oil for greasing

In a large bowl, weigh out the flour. With your fingers, rub in the salt at one edge of the bowl, and the sachet of dried yeast on the opposite side. Add the  water to the dry ingredients, and mix together until it forms a  dough (use your
dough to mop up any flour sticking to the side of the bowl). Cover your bowl with a damp tea towel
and rest in a warm place for about 45 minutes.

Oil the fingertips of one hand, and forcefully fold the dough in half inside the bowl. Turn the bowl a
quarter turn, and repeat until you have removed most of the air. Cover your bowl again rest the dough for another 45 minutes, whilst your oven preheats to it’s hottest temperature (around 250C).

Tip your dough out on to a lightly oiled surface and roll into a long sausage. Chop the dough into equal pieces (Jame’s suggests 8, I go for 10). Take each piece and, using a rolling pin, roll them out until they are about half a centimetre thick. Pop straight onto a baking tray and slide into the oven, turning down the temperature to 220C as soon as they are in. Bake for 8-12 minutes depending depending on how soft or crisp you like them. They should puff up into balls and are blush with a golden colour. But even if they don’t puff up, they’ll be delicious…

Other recipes inspired by Brilliant Bread are my Bagels (which I’m now desperately craving – there’s nothing better than a homemade bagel filled with pastrami and mustard!) and Focaccia.  And in short – I highly recommend that if you want to bake bread, you buy this book. You won’t regret it!

Are you a fan of baking your own bread?

Recipe: Spicy Lamb Sausage Rolls

Aren’t sausage rolls just the perfect party or picnic food?! I’m not talking about the dubious, slightly flabby ones you can buy in Greggs (although I have to admit I have been partial to one or two of those the morning after a heavy night!), but ones fresh from the oven. A really meat filling, full of flavour, with crispy pastry that’s as buttery as it is flaky.

These are just that bit more special. Instead of the more traditional pork filling I’ve used lamb mince, which I’ve spiced up with harissa. I’ve added other spices, plus some lemon zest to add some freshness. The lamb mince is bulked out with an egg and some breadcrumbs, as the true sausage roll isn’t *too* meaty. This keeps the filling nice and moist too. Now, W likes these hot and fresh from the oven, whilst I’m a fan of them cold the next day. Either way, they’re gorgeous with a salad on the side, and also alongside a soup. I can imagine they’d be perfect next to a tomato soup, damn you allergy!

These Spicy Lamb Sausage Rolls are just wonderful – comforting pastry combined with chilli heat. I know they will be featuring in many of our picnics this summer!

Recipe – makes 8 large sausage rolls, inspired by a Waitrose recipe

  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 2 tbsp harissa paste (I use this one, it’s super spicy!)
  • 1 regular pack of lamb mince, I used around 400g
  • 1 lemon, zest only
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 slice fresh bread, blitzed into breadcrumbs (around 40g worth)
  • 2 medium eggs
  • 1 sheet of ready-rolled pastry
  • Seeds – I used a mix of sesame and poppy – for scattering over the top

First off, fry the onion along with the fennel and cumin seeds in a little oil until soft, around 5 minutes. Add the garlic and the harissa and continue to fry for another few minutes. Allow to cool completely, before mixing together with the lamb mince, lemon zest, breadcrumbs, one of the eggs and some seasoning. You’ll need to get your hands dirty to make sure the mix is full combined.

Cut the pastry in half lengthways (so you have two long strips). Form the meat mixture into two long ‘sausages’ along the middle of each piece of pastry. Brush along one edge with pastry, then roll the other edge over the top of the meat and seal together – repeat with the other piece of pastry. Slice each roll into four, then brush with plenty of beaten egg, sprinkle with seeds and bake at 200C for around 25 minutes, or until golden and crispy.

These are delicious both warm and cold – perfect for an early summer picnic! Or an indoor picnic (as in these photos) if the British weather decides to be a tad wetter than ideal!

What picnic food are you partial to?