Recipe: Curried Haddock Chowder

Chowder. My biggest food love of 2018. We discovered it on honeymoon, when I managed to eat probably 7 bowls of the stuff over the trip (and given food was a big part of the trip, anything repeated even twice had to be good!). Whilst I haven’t recreated the New England Clam version that absolutely has my heart, this version has become a regular on our meal plan.

 photo Curried Chowder_zpsryikvxl4.jpgIt’s fairly budget friendly, which gives it a big advantage over the clam version. It’s also fairly quick to make which makes it the absolute perfect afterwork supper. This recipe makes 2 massive bowlfuls, and it’s wonderful hearty. Chunks of veg and fish, and the most beautiful spiced broth. You can vary the spicing to suit your tastes, but I tend to go on the hotter end of the spectrum – mainly because every time I’ve made it one or both of us has been suffering from a cold. And the best thing is that it could be easily bulked up. Add naan bread if you’re super hungry, and a handful of prawns stirred in would be amazing too. In fact, I think I might have to try that tonight…

 photo Curried Haddock Chowder 6_zpsvvaboctk.jpg photo Curried Haddock Chowder 8_zpsgcizsct5.jpgRecipe (serves 2, or would stretch to 3 if served with some naan bread)

  • 2 fillets of smoked haddock (I used frozen and defrosted in the fridge during the day)
  • 1 onion
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 small leek
  • 1 celery stick
  • 2 medium potatoes (around 250g)
  • 1 red chilli
  • 1 tbsp of curry powder (if you don’t have any of the other spices, up this to 2 tbsp)
  • ½ tsp of ground cumin
  • ½ tsp of ground coriander
  • ½ tsp of turmeric
  • 400ml of stock (I normally use chicken, but vegetable or fish would also work well)
  • 50-1000ml of cream, depending on how creamy you would like it
  • Large handful of fresh coriander, chopped

First up, chop your veg. Finely dice the onion, carrot and celery, and finely slice the leek. Peel the potato and cut into dice, about 3-4cm cubed. In a large pan, heat a splash of olive oil and add the onions, carrot, celery, and chilli with a pinch of salt, and sweat for 10-12 minutes. When the vegetables are soft, add the spices and stir in. Fry for 2 minutes, then add the stock and diced potatoes. Simmer for 15 minutes until the potatoes are almost cooked.

Add the cream and bring back to the boil. Tear in the haddock and simmer for five minutes, then add the coriander and stir in. I sometimes stir in some fresh spinach too for some extra greens. Season well with plenty of black pepper, then serve in bowls.

 photo Curried Haddock Chowder 4_zpskiun775u.jpgThis Curried Chowder is perfect on a winter’s night, I think I’m addicted to it! So comforting and flavourful, it could also be made in a big batch and served as part of an informal dinner party.

Have you ever tried chowder?

Recipe: Peanut Protein Pancakes with Degustabox [gifted]

One of the things I’ve become really conscious of over the last few months is making sure my diet contains enough protein. We’re gradually cutting down on the amount of meat we do eat, and my vegan lunchbox challenge means I’m avoiding dairy and eggs a large amount of time too – so I’m keen to find easy ways we can squeeze in an extra portion. It turns out that the January Degustabox* was perfect for this.

 photo Peanut Butter Protein Pancakes_zpsqoklx0au.jpgIt was full to the brim of all sorts of goodies – with the nice added touch that they squeezed in some extra protein into our diet. The Protein Crunchy Rye Breads from Ryvita were absolutely delicious, and perfect with a vegan soup as part of my lunchbox challenge (more on that next week!). We’ll definitely be picking up more of them in the future. I also loved that a variety of plain rice and lentil cakes were including – topped with peanut butter they’re my go-to rushed breakfast or quick study day snack and I’ve really enjoyed the branded versions. In fact they were so much nicer and the price point actually isn’t as extreme as I’d though, so I’m converted!

This post, however, is all about the PBfit powder. It really surprised me by being so delicious just made into peanut butter with water (think Reese’s and you’re not too far of) but I also found it such a great and easy thing to bake with. I also loved that it made pancakes actually fill me up for longer too – usually I’m ravenous after a couple of hours, but this recipe got me right through up until lunch. It’s full of peanut flavour, the pancakes themselves are nice and fluffy (and not too sweet) and it goes perfectly with the fresh raspberry ‘jam’ made with chia and some yoghurt. Save to say this is perfect for pancake day – or indeed any day!

 photo Peanut Butter Protein Pancakes 5_zpsifcvgcum.jpg photo Peanut Butter Protein Pancakes 7_zpsa0nwm6tb.jpgRecipe (serves 2 – the batter keeps in the fridge for a day, or you could make the pancakes in advance and reheat in a low oven)

  • 175ml milk (plus a splash more if needed – I found one batch was fine, but another needed a touch more)
  • 1 large egg
  • 75g plain flour
  • 25g peanut butter powder
  • pinch of ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • Vegetable oil or butter, for frying
  • For the ‘jam’ – a handful of fresh or frozen raspberries and a generous tablespoon of chia seeds

First off, make the jam. This can be made in advance, I find it keeps well in the fridge for about five days. Simply heat the raspberries in a small pan (add a splash of water if they’ve fresh) and once soft and juicy squish them with the back of a spoon. Stir in the chia seeds, and keep stirring until you have a sticky and jam like texture – if you want you can blend it at this stage but I quite like the texture from the seeds.

For the pancakes, whisk the milk and eggs in a jug, then set aside. Sieve the flour and the baking powder into a bowl, add the peanut powder and cinnamon, then stir to combine. Gradually add in the milk and egg mixture and beat well – don’t worry if it’s a little lumpy. Heat a little oil or butter in a frying pan over a medium heat and, when hot, pour half a ladle of batter into the pan. I go for pancakes that are a little smaller, say around 6-8cm in diametter
Cook until bubbles start to form and the underside is golden, then flip the pancake over and cook the other side for a few minutes. Keep warm in a low over whilst you use up the remaining batter – I usually get 6-8 pancakes out of this recipe.

 photo Peanut Butter Protein Pancakes 3_zpsi5yhsrnz.jpg photo Peanut Butter Protein Pancakes 6_zps1fdrffdf.jpgServe stacked, drizzled with the jam and some yoghurt. It’s also divine with some maple syrup for more peanut butter if you’re feeling naughty!

*I receive a gifted monthly subscription to Degustabox, but am under no obligation to post this recipe. This recipe wasn’t paid for and, as always, all opinions are my very own.

Will you be eating pancakes next Tuesday? Are you a thin crepe or fluffy American stack type of person?

Recipe: Ham, Pea & Apple Salad with Roast Potatoes

Over the past year or so I’ve developed a love for salads. Not just a sad bag of soggy leaves, but real meal-in-a-bowl hearty salads. Crunch, texture, different temperatures, plenty of flavour. There’s something about a good salad that I really, really love – and this Pea, Apple, Ham and Potato Salad is one of my favourites.

 photo Pea Salad_zpsowduhnl7.jpgThis sounds like a strange combination of flavours, but as a salad it really, really works. Peas add freshness, apple adds both sweetness and crunch. A base of mild flavoured salad leaves allows the flavours to really sing. Ham is almost used as a seasoning (we’ve also made use of leftover roast gammon in this recipe), whilst the roast potatoes add a contrasting temperature and brings bulk to the dish. It’s a real hearty main-meal salad.

 photo Pea Apple and Ham Hock Salad 5_zps7j2fty60.jpg photo Pea Apple and Ham Hock Salad 3_zpsxbfptlgt.jpgIt’s also really quite versatile. Like I said, we’ve made it with leftover gammon. We’ve used extra thick sliced ham. And we’ve used shredded ham hock. I prefer the ham hock version as you pretty much get some with every forkful, but all are good. If you’re short of time it’s also good with just some boiled new potatoes – it might lack a bit of depth, but it’s still tasty.

Recipe (serves 2)

  • 250g new potatoes
  • 1 garlic clove, skin on (omit if you’re just boiling the potatoes)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 green apple
  • 40ml cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds, toasted in a dry frying pan for a minute or two
  • 4 tbsp natural yogurt
  • 1 bag of pea shoots or lamb’s lettuce (or a mix of both)
  • Ham – either 1 thick slice each, a pack of shredded ham hock or some leftover gammon
  • 125g frozen peas, defrosted

First off, roast the potatoes. Toss them in a large roasting tin with the garlic, oil and some seasoning, then bake at 200C for 50 minutes. Meanwhile slice the apple into thin slices (no need to peel) then place in a bowl with the vinegar and a pinch of salt for 15 minutes.

Crush half of the cumin in a pestle and mortar, and add to the yoghurt along with 1 garlic clove from the roasting tin (let it cool for a few minutes, then squeeze the flesh from the skin). Drain the apple (discard the vinegar) and toss the potatoes, apple, leaves and peas together with the ham. Pile onto plates, drizzle with the dressing, scatter over the remaining cumin seeds and eat immediately.
 photo Pea Apple and Ham Hock Salad 4_zpsd7cay5ig.jpg

Are you a salad fan?

Recipe: Haggis Carbonara for Burn’s Night

I love haggis, but I totally get that it isn’t for everyone. Particularly if you’ve never tried it, yet you’ve googled what’s in it. I’m of the opinion that if I’m willing to eat meat I should be willing to eat all meat, so things like haggis, black pudding and offal don’t bother me at all – but I still understand that it can turn people’s stomachs a tad! With this in mind I wanted to create a Haggis dish which is perfect as the ‘introduction’ to haggis. Haggis for beginners, if you will.

 photo Haggis Carbonara_zpsglm4oomv.jpg photo Haggis Carbonara 9_zps39wa1lek.jpgAnd so Haggis Carbonara was born.

Instead of a lump of haggis you’ve got crumbled up bits throughout the carbonara sauce. You’ve got cheesy creaminess to break up the strong pepperiness of the haggis. And pasta, because you can’t go wrong with carbs. In fact the haggis pasta combo is a winner in my book. This dish is rich, hearty and unbelievably comforting. Perfect for a Burn’s Night supper in – and great if you want to give haggis a go this January.

 photo Haggis Carbonara 8_zpswhef8xoo.jpg photo Haggis Carbonara 19_zpssc66rv8s.jpgRecipe (serves 2)

  • Decent knob of butter
  • 2 rounds of haggis (I used patties – cheaper and less scary than getting a ‘whole’ haggis!)
  • 2 eggs – one whole and one yolk only (freeze the white for making meringues)
  • A good handful of cheese – I went for parmesan and a good grating of a Scottish cheddar
  • 180g pasta – spaghetti or tagliatelle is best really

First of put the pasta on to boil. I find 10 minutes is about right for most pastas. Meanwhile fry your haggis in butter – I crumbled mine up completely, but you could leave it in bigger chunks. I’d say crumbled is easier if you’re just starting out with haggis though! While that’s frying beat the egg and yolk in a mug and add your grated cheeses (keep some back for sprinkling on top!).

Now my secret for carbonara – take a tablespoon of the boiling pasta water (while the pasta is still cooking) and dribble it into the egg-cheese while beating with a fork. Do the same with another spoon – and repeat until the cheese has melted and you have a smooth mixture. Not only does this lighten the sauce but it also seems to reduce the risk of ending up with scrambled eggs.

Once the pasta has boiled, drain (reserve some water), and tip straight in with the haggis. Toss together. Turn the heat off, and wait a few minutes. Add the egg mixture gradually (tossing well between additions) into the pasta. If it starts to scramble don’t add any more; wait another minute but stir through some cooking water. Once all the egg is in, if its not quite cooked enough to your liking (I’m not fussy about really runny egg!) put the pan back on a very low heat. Then serve, sprinkle with extra cheese and eat as quickly as possible. Trust me, cold carbonara isn’t a good thing!

And if you want to make my (legendary) carbonara without the haggis, simply fry a little bacon until crisp and follow the same recipe, adding plenty of black pepper. I personally think haggis is peppery enough so wouldn’t add any to this particular dish.

 photo Haggis Carbonara 15_zpsy1awggq5.jpg photo Haggis Carbonara 20_zpsg7llbs9q.jpg photo Haggis Carbonara 13_zpss4wzzeso.jpgI originally posted this recipe a good 5 years ago now (with some pretty wonderful photos I must admit) and it’s been one of my most popular posts. So much so I thought some up to date camera skills were needed!

*In the interests of complete disclosure the post was originally in collaboration with Sykes Cottages, but I’ve not had any request to rewrite the post! 

Have you ever tried haggis?

Recipe: Vegan Lentil & Mushroom ‘Stoup’

What makes the difference between a stew or casserole and a soup? I like to think it’s a fine line, and this ‘stoup’ kinda sits in the middle. You can add more stock or some vegan milk to thin it down for a soup, or blend it up more and reduce it for a stew-type dish. Whichever you choose, it’s absolutely delicious and I think one of my favourite winter lunches.

 photo Mushroom Lentil Soup_zpslbz1od61.jpgIt’s creamy, it’s comforting, real soul food. It’s garlick-y and slighty herby. There’s a kick of black pepper and a slight tang from a splash of vinegar. It’s not vinegar-y as such, but it helps to add a little bit of complexity that makes this really feel like a meal, and not just something you’ve thrown together. Add some toast or a bit of sourdough bread and this is a real hug in a bowl.

It’s also vegan! If you follow me on Instagram you’ll know I’ve set myself a challenge in 2019 to make as many of my lunchboxes as possible vegan. I’m not constraining myself too much by this, and if I’ve got meat or dairy that needs using then it will be thrown in, but I’d like to keep the majority of them vegan. And frankly, if they all taste as good as this it will be an easy job. If you’re not vegan, however, additions which could work well would be bacon (always), or simmer with a parmesan rind to add some extra flavour.

 photo Vegan Mushroom and Lentil Soup 10_zpsethbwgep.jpgIngredients (makes 4 lunch-time servings)

  • 150g dried Puy lentils
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 1 pack of mushrooms mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 cup vegan-friendly stock
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened plant-based milk—I used Oat milk

First up, cook your lentils. I tend to add boiling water and bring to a rolling boil, before reducing the heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Add plenty of salt, cook for another five minutes and then drain.

Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a medium pan and cook the shallots until slightly softened and translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the sliced mushrooms to the pot, turn up the heat and stir fry for a few minutes. Add the garlic and thyme, and continue to try for 1 minute before adding the vinegar. Stir until evaporated, then add the drained lentils, vegetable stock and  milk to the pot. Stir and bring to a boil, before using a stick blender to whizz to your desired consistency. Add more milk or stock if you want a soup, or reheat and simmer until thick and stew-like. Check for seasoning, adding plenty of black pepper.

Serve hot with toast or bread. I also like to stir through some spinach – for lunchboxes I add a cube or two of frozen spinach in the morning before I leave the house.

 photo Vegan Mushroom and Lentil Soup 8_zpsdzcibo5b.jpgFor something so quick the result is so flavourful and cosy – it does taste as though it’s been simmering away for hours. It also makes my flat smell super good, so I’m down with that…

Do you have any lunchbox friendly vegan recipes?

Cooking From: Midwinter Suppers from The Christmas Chronicles

This book is so much more than just a cookbook. Not only is it ones of the most Instagrammable books I own, it’s also one of the loveliest to cosy up and read at this time of year. Nigel has such a wonderful way of writing, so personal that this feels more like a diary than a collection of recipes. Indeed it’s full of so many of his own memories of the festive period, interspersed with recipes covering the main event of turkey and goose, to how to use leftovers and all manner of other delicious things. And it’s not just the usual Christmassy fare either, the book takes the reader from the beginning of November all the way to the end of February. And somehow each recipe seems absolutely perfect for this time of year.

 photo Nigel Slater Christmas Chronicles 11_zpsdzfefrii.jpgNigel is able, in both his cookery programmes and books, to completely relax me. It’s his voice, but also his wordings and the way he simply puts sentences (and ingredients) together. And his recipes are just the same – simple, uncomplicated and all the ones I’ve tried have been delicious. This book is all about cosy winter food, which sums up both recipes we’ve cooked.

 photo Nigel Slater Christmas Chronicles 14_zpsmvwb833m.jpg photo Nigel Slater Christmas Chronicles 15_zps56obvc7p.jpg photo Nigel Slater Christmas Chronicles 16_zpslfvfgbhr.jpgThe Black Pudding and Baked Apples with Celeriac and Mustard Mash might be a bit of an unusual combination, but it’s one of the best things I’ve eaten in the past few weeks. It’s warm and comforting, and genuinely feels like a big hug on a plate. Just a few ingredients, a bit of time (but not too much) and you’ve got a delicious plate of food – and this also makes the whole flat smell amazing from the baked apples.

Then there’s the Pork Chop with Cheesy Spinach Polenta. We’d never tried cooking with Polenta until last week, but I’m fairly sure it could become a new obsession. Super creamy, a little cheesy, instensely savoury and perfectly matched with the tender yet slightly caramelised pork chop. Another dish which made us feel enveloped in a satisified happy foodie fog.

As a last minute edit, we also ate the polenta with onions and cheese (Camembert will do – favourite line in the whole book) yesterday evening. Rib-stickingly heavy with cheese and oh so glorious.

But there’s so many other recipes I’d love to try! The Roast Goose with Lemon Potato Stuffing is high on my list, and the Oxtail with Butter Beans and Sherry sounds amazing.

 photo Nigel Slater Christmas Chronicles 10_zpsqywase2j.jpg photo Nigel Slater Christmas Chronicles 13_zpskswejamu.jpgSo much more than a cookbook, this is currently living on my bedside table. I can see it becoming almost a tradition to pull it out and cook from it each festive season…

What’s your favourite festive recipe?

Recipe: Blood Orange Noodle Salad (perfect for Leftover Turkey!)

One of our resolutions for 2018 was to cook at least one new recipe a week. And it may just be the first resolution that I’ve not only managed to keep for longer than a few months, but that I’ve managed to keep all year. I’m beyond proud that we’ve done this, in some weeks cooking more than 4 new recipes. We’ve added things to our repertoire, we’ve tried things I wouldn’t have usually gone near.

 photo Blood Orange Noodle Salad_zps5ee5catj.jpgAnd one of the first new recipes we’ve tried, and one of my favourites, was this Blood Orange Salad. Originally a Sainsbury’s recipe made with duck, I think it would work wonderfully well as a way to jazz up leftover Turkey meat (particularly thigh meat).

The sauce is zingy and hot with chilli, sharp from the rice vinegar (an ingredient I wish I’d given in and bought sooner, it adds so much more life to noodle dressings). The blood orange gives it the most amazing seasonal flavour, still fresh and zesty but not as harsh as lime. Cucumber adds freshness, there’s plenty of crunch from the veggies, and the double-herb hit of mint and coriander just pulled it all together. The slow-roasted duck leg is both meltingly soft meat and really crunchy skin, which contrasts well with the juicy blood orange – if you’re using leftover turkey I’d recommend throwing some of the skin in the pan and frying on a really high heat to get the same effect.

 photo Blood Orange Noodle Salad with Duck or Turkey 5_zps6aic4lif.jpg photo Blood Orange Noodle Salad with Duck or Turkey 7_zpszwpvhphh.jpgRecipe (serves 2)

  • 1 duck leg, or around 300g leftover turkey meat
  • 2 nests of dried rice noodles
  • 1 medium carrot, peeled
  • 1⁄2 cucumber
  • 2 spring onions
  • 4 radishes
  • 100g sugar snap peas
  • 1/2 a Chinese Leaf, core removed
  • 1 pack mint, leaves only
  • 1 pack coriander, leaves only
  • 2 blood oranges (one whole, the other juiced for the dressing, below)
  • 30g peanuts, roughly chopped
  • For the dressing – 2 tbsp sesame seeds, 1 red chilli, 2 garlic cloves, 2 tbsp light brown sugar, juice of 1 blood orange, 2 tbsp Thai fish sauce, 3 tbsp rice vinegar

If making with the duck, pop the duck leg on a baking tray and season them generously with salt and black pepper, rubbing it into the skin. Roast the duck for 11⁄2 hours at 180C, until the skin is crisp and the flesh soft and tender. Once ready slice the meat and skin into rough chunks, discarding any bone. If making with leftover turkey meat, heat a little sesame oil in a wok and fry the turkey over a high heat until heated through. Do this just before serving.

For the dressing, toast the sesame seeds in a small pan for about a minute, giving them a stir now and then. Tip them into a jug, add all the other dressing ingredients (with the chilli and garlic finely chopped) and stir together.

Cook the rice noodles following pack instructions, then drain and rinse in cold water, shaking off the excess. Tip into a large bowl. Slice the carrot and cucumber into matchsticks, trim the spring onions and slice them into shreds of a similar length. Trim and slice the radishes. Slice the sugar snaps lengthways. Shred the Chinese leaf, mint and coriander. Add all these ingredients to the bowl with the noodles as you prepare them.

Slice the whole orange into rounds and halve the rounds, removing obvious pips, skin and pith. Add the oranges (and any juice) to the bowl with the salad ingredients; gently toss together. Add the rest of the dressing to the noodles and toss using tongs. Layer the salad, meat and noodles onto large plates; sprinkle with the peanuts and serve.

 photo Blood Orange Noodle Salad with Duck or Turkey 3_zps8gaf5blq.jpg photo Blood Orange Noodle Salad with Duck or Turkey 1_zpsd9op4uks.jpgThis would be very much welcome as a Christmas leftover dinner – perhaps not on Boxing Day (I’m still alllll about cold cuts, bubble and squeak and cheese) but on the days that follow it would perk even the scroggiest of people up. And of course it feels nice and healthy, so kicks off all the good intentions for the New Year…given the sucess of cooking new recipes this year, I know one resolution that I’ll be carrying through into 2019!

Have you ever kept any resolutions? How do you use up turkey leftovers?

Food: Three Ways with Rice [AD]

One of my favourite smells in the world is rice being cooked. I can’t explain why I love it so much, but I find it comforting, a smell which *always* makes me hungry and excited for dinner. It’s safe to say that because of this we eat a lot of rice! Whether it’s a meal we’ve batch-cooked and frozen for busy evenings (this Vegan Curry is perfect), or our bog-standard Stir-Fry, we love it.

 photo Veetee Recipes_zps14mxr47s.jpgBut rice can be SO much more than just a side for a curry. Rather than being there to soak up sauce you can turn rice into the main event of a meal, and that’s just what VeeTee challenged me to do here. Three different meals, each showcasing a different type of rice in their new rice pots. Each designed to be easy, tasty and made on a budget. Perfect for students, those who have limited time in the evenings, or those with titchy kitchens (hey most Londoners!).

 photo Veetee Taco Bowls  10_zpszspor2fb.jpg photo Veetee Taco Bowls  2_zpsnzgxo2ju.jpgTaco Bowl with Green Rice (serves 2-3)

The first up is one of my favourites, and something we eat quite often. Mexican flavours are so bold and fresh, but it can also be a wonderfully comforting meal with the black beans and a few cheeky tortilla chips! In the photos here we’ve got for ‘a bit of everything’ with some refried beans, spicy chicken, salad and pink pickled onions on a bed of super-green rice. And really, the rice is just the star of the show. Zingy and full of flavour, it’s the perfect base for taco bowl!

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 2 Thai Jasmine Rice Pots
  • 3 generous handfuls of spinach
  • 1 onion, roughly chopped
  • 2 cloves of garlic, peeled
  • 1 bunch coriander, stalks and leaves
  • 1 can black beans, drained (but reserve the water!)
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 4 chicken thighs, or 2 chicken breasts if you prefer (this is also fab with pork steaks or even thin frying steaks, just adjust the cooking time)
  • 1 tsp chipotle paste
  • Toppings – cheese, pink pickled onions, tortilla chips, avo, soured cream, salad…

First up, make the rice. Pop 1tbsp olive oil, and the lime juice, spinach, coriander, half the onion and one of the garlic cloves into a small blender or mini-chopper. Blitz until you have a rough puree, add some salt and pepper, then transfer to small baking dish. Break in the rice and stir until evenly coated (and the rice has separated into grains) – I find it easier to use my hands for this. Cover tightly with tin-foil and pop into an oven at 120C until everything is ready. It wants at least 20 minutes, but can sit for up to an hour like this.

Then make the refried beans. I’ve posted my long recipe for these before, but here’s the quick way! Fry the rest of the onion and garlic in another tbsp of oil until soft, then pop into a blender (wiped down from the green puree, but no need to give it a full wash) with 2/3 of the black beans and some of the reserved water from the can. Blitz until smooth, then pop back into the frying pan with the rest of the beans and the cumin. Season well, and continue to fry over a low heat, stirring often, for around ten or so minutes whilst you prep the chicken or meat (or keep it veggie, roasted cauliflower works well here too!).

For the chicken, I simply chopped it into strips, fried the chipotle paste in the remaining oil, then added the chicken and fried over a high heat until cooked through. Super simple, but really tasty!

To serve, just assemble your bowls with the rice, beans and chicken, add your toppings and enjoy! The seasoned green rice really makes this dish into something special – it’s fresh and full of flavour, and great for sneaking some extra iron into your diet. It’s also fab used as a burrito stuffing…

 photo Veetee Taco Bowls  9_zpska23uuzj.jpg photo Veetee Cheats Risotto 8_zpsorvh1kwd.jpgCheat’s Butternut Squash Risotto (serves 1)

If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you’ll know my all-time favourite comfort food is a risotto. I just love it, and I would eat one every night if I could. I do love the process of making one, and find stirring SO therapeutic but sometimes you want the comfort without the faff. Enter my cheats risotto!

I’ve paired butternut squash here with the wholegrain rice, as I think the nuttier flavour of the rice really cuts through the sweetness of the squash. It’s truly delicious!

  • 2 handfuls of frozen butternut squash
  • 1 pinch dried thyme and/or sage
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 celery stick, finely chopped (optional, but I seem to always have some going limp in my fridge!)
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 Wholegrain Brown Rice Pot
  • Splash of milk
  • A good handful (or two!) of Parmesan cheese
  • Salad, to serve

Pop the squash in the oven as per pack instructions (usually around 25 minutes). With around 10 minutes to go, fry the onion and celery in the oil with the dried herb(s) until soft, adding in the garlic towards the blend. Pop the squash into a small blender or mini chopped with a splash of milk, then blend until smooth. You could keep some chunks back too for some texture if you like.

Add the rice to the frying pan with the onion mix and fry for a minute or so, breaking up with a spoon. Add the squash puree and stir well, thinning with a little extra milk if needed. Add in most of the cheese, season well with pepper, then serve with salad and some extra cheese. Perfect for a quick, virtually hands-free cosy supper!

 photo Veetee Cheats Risotto 4_zps5ey67hbf.jpg photo Veetee Biryani 4_zpsz8stnn2f.jpgQuick & Easy Biryani (serves 2)

I’m fairly sure Biryani, or ‘Curried Rice’ was one of the first things I learnt to cook for myself, when I was a pre-teen in the school holidays fed up of cheese sandwiches! Whilst this is a step-up in terms of flavour from that recipe (and probably presentation too!) it’s certainly just as easy. Best of all it only involves one pan so there’s minimal washing up!

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 pepper, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 2 teaspoons medium curry powder – or you could use a blend of spices such as ground coriander, garam masala, cardamom, mustard seeds etc
  • 2-4 chicken thighs, chopped into small cubes (depending on how hungry you are!) – this would also work well with leftover roast lamb, or even prawns with an adjusted cooking time. Or add some chickpeas or cauliflower and keep it veggie!
  • 2 Basmati Rice Pots
  • 3 good handfuls of spinach, or a few cubes of frozen spinach
  • A handful of coriander for garnishing, if liked

Simply fry the onion in the onion until soft, then add the pepper, garlic and curry powder or spices. Fry until fragrant, then stir in the chicken and continue frying until cooked. Stir in the rice with a small splash of boiling water, then add the spinach. Heat until hot, then serve sprinkled with some fresh coriander. Alternatively, if your frying pan is oven-proof, loosely cover with foil and bake for around 15 minutes at 200C to get a slightly more authentic texture.

And that’s it! Three quick and easy rice dishes that are firmly in our meal rotation. The Biryani in particular is so quick, and you could add all sorts of extra veggie in there. In fact I think it might have to be tonight’s dinner…

For more inspiration for cooking with rice, VeeTee have LOADS of recipes on their site. I’m especially intrigued by the Spanish Sausage Rice and the Korean Bipimbab!
 photo Veetee Biryani 8_zpszbjlkhab.jpg

*This post is in collaboration with VeeTee, however as always all opinions are my own. I only ever work with brands I know, love and would buy myself! 

Are you a rice fan? What’s your favourite rice recipe?

Recipe: Brussel Sprout, Bacon & Blue Cheese Pizza

I’m a bit lacking in Christmas recipes this year – I usually like to start testing and photographing them (getting myself firmly in the festive spirit at the same time!) during November, but lying on a beach in Hawaii until the end of October meant I felt firmly un-Christmassy until last week. There’s been no edible gift testing (so who knows what my colleagues will end up with!), we’re even well behind normal consumption levels of Pigs in Blankets.

 photo Brussel Sprout Pizza_zpshls8suso.jpgWhat I do have, though, is this festive pizza. And I’d like to think it makes up for all the other lack of festive recipes coming up in this space. It’s crunchy and cheese, rich and decadent, and really delivers a punch of festive flavours. The honk of blue cheese always reminds me of festive cheeseboards (and one particular hour-long car journey with W’s family and some potted Stilton, not something I care to repeat!). Cranberry sauce just because. And the sprouts.

Brussel sprouts are so reminiscent of childhood Christmases where I’d be made to eat “just one” – and actually this continues now as I still hate the things served up with a Christmas dinner. Shredded onto pizza, pasta, in a salad then fine. Steamed or boiled and covered in gravy and they are my foo of nightmare. But they DO work on pizza.

As it’s a no-tomato pizza it runs the risk of becoming a little dry, but we’ve both spread the base and dotted spoonfuls of mascarpone over to add some creaminess. It’s also fab with walnuts to replace the bacon for a veggie pizza.

 photo Brussel Sprout Pizza 1_zpsnde98ss5.jpg photo Brussel Sprout Pizza 3_zpsmdqe38uv.jpgRecipe (for one)

  • 1 ready-made plain pizza base (or make your own, my recipe is here)
  • 1 rasher of bacon, diced
  • 8 brussel sprouts, base removed and finely shredded
  • a pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 4 tbsp of mascarpone
  • 25-50g blue cheese depending on your taste, you could substitute for brie or even mozzarella if you prefer
  • 1 tsp cranberry sauce, to serve

Fry your bacon in a small amount of olive oil or butter until crisp, then add the sprouts. Stir fry for a minute or two. Meanwhile spread 2 tbsp of mascarpone over your pizza base, and season with black pepper and the grated nutmeg. Scatter the spouts and bacon over the bacon, dot over more mascarpone, and sprinkle over the blue cheese. Bake for around 10 minutes at 200C, then serve with a drizzle of cranberry sauce.

 photo Brussel Sprout Pizza 4_zpskj6spx1q.jpgI imagine this would also work well with leftover sprouts from the big day itself, certainly a step up from Bridget Jones’ mum doing a turkey curry buffet!

Are you a fan of brussel sprouts?

Recipe: Using Up Leftover Roast Pork in a Bánh Mì (Vietnamese Baguette)

We’re firm believers in this household that just because there’s only two of us we shouldn’t miss out on a traditional Sunday lunch – if fact we have all the more reason to indulge as the leftovers will give us at least a couple of days of dinners too! Last week I shared my recipe for a basic Roast Pork, a recipe that will usually serve us (very) generously on the Sunday and give a good two or three days of dinners throughout the week.

 photo Banh Mi with Leftover Roast Pork 8_zpsphxjvzoi.jpg photo Roast Pork 1_zpsy6ltxnuk.jpgPork has been, for many years, my least favourite cut of meat for roasting. Don’t get me wrong, I love a slab of belly pork, but can give or take a roast. It’s still perhaps my least favourite of a Sunday, but the leftovers are quickly becoming a lot more interesting! The meat can take a lot of flavouring, meaning some really, really tasty dinners. Best of all is that it’s quite quick to dry out, meaning these dinners are generally ready in a flash. Can’t complain if I can have the dinner on the table less than twenty minutes after walking through the door!

Based on the recipe in ‘Save with Jamie’ (one of my favourite cookbooks, which I’ll be featuring very soon!) this is the perfect sandwich. Hot and crispy pork, cool and crunchy veg, smooth pate, fierce with chilli, cooling cucumber, sharp from some light pickling and all in between a soft baguette. Part-baked works well here, simply bake then wrap in a clean tea-towel to avoid it being too crisp.

Recipe (Serves 2 generously, could probably be stretched to 3)

  • One carrot, peeled (we freeze the peelings along with onion skins/tops, offcuts of celery etc to make stock with a roast chicken carcass)
  • Quarter of a cucumber
  • Quarter of a cabbage, I’d go white over red here
  • One tablespoon caster sugar (avoid granulated as it may not dissolve)
  • Three tablespoons of cider vinegar
  • 100g smooth pate (we used chicken liver pate, I’d like to make our own for this recipe in the future to utilise the coriander stalks and reduce waste)
  • Half a bunch of fresh coriander, leaves only, finely chopped
  • 150 leftover roast pork
  • 3 tablespoons of sweet chilli sauce (we didn’t have any, so I mixed 3 tablespoons of chilli jam with the zest and juice of a lime and a little bit of fresh ginger)
  • 2 part-baked baguettes

Bake the baguettes per the packet instructions, then cool wrapped in a clean tea towel. Meanwhile cut the carrot and cucumber into matchsticks (a Julienne peeler makes this super quick) and finely slice the cabbage. Pop in a bowl with the vinegar and sugar, along with a pinch of salt, and leave to lightly pickle. You want to leave the veggies for around ten minutes.

Heat a small amount of oil in a frying pan and add the pork. Fry over a high heat until hot, then add the chilli sauce. Continue to fry until golden and slightly crisp, then remove from the heat. Assemble your Bánh mì by spreading the baguette with pate, then piling in the pork, pickled veggies and some fresh coriander. Add some freshly sliced chilli for some extra heat too if you like!

 photo Banh Mi with Leftover Roast Pork 7_zpsg5dduprc.jpgThen just enjoy, but be warned. These do get messy! This is pretty much my dream sandwich, something I could eat night after night…

What is your favourite meal for using up leftovers?