Recipe: From-Scratch Laksa (Spicy Malaysian Noodle Soup with Chicken, Prawns & Egg)

As part of my foodie goals this year, I really wanted to start eating and cooking more authentic Asian cuisine. My standard stir-fry is all well and good, but I wanted to play with new-to-me ingredients, try new techniques and produce some really exciting dishes. This laksa might not be complicated (though it does create a huge amount of washing up!), but it tastes wonderful.

Generally, laksa is a spicy broth, served over rice noodles with chicken and prawns. I’ve added a little coconut milk to my version, both to temper the spice and also to make it smoother and creamier. I’ve also added a soft-boiled egg, because I’ve come to love the flavour of an oozing egg yolk in spicier foods. The whole thing is sweat-inducingly spicy, and somehow subtly combines sweet, salty and sour notes. It makes for a wonderful Friday night fakeaway, and I know I’ll be making this again and again.

The key to a good laksa, as I’ve discovered, is taking the time to make your own paste. I’ve used ready-prepared ones and they just aren’t quite the same. Yes, it might take a while (both to make and also to hunt down some of the ingredients) but it’s well worth it – and my quantities here make double the amount needed. I’ve frozen it in an ice-cube tray so I can make laksa whenever the mood strikes me.

Oh, and for an even quicker version I have made this using leftover roast chicken and ready cooked prawns. If the paste has been ready-made it’s the perfect quick after-work supper – and it’s wonderful if you’ve got a cold brewing!

This recipe was based on Ping Coobes version in Delicious Magazine. I’ve simplified it a bit based on the ingredients I was able to find – some of them you may need to hunt down in your local Asian supermarket (I specifically struggled finding shrimp paste and galangal).

Recipe for the Laksa Pasta (enough for 4 servings)

  • 1 tsp of dried chilli flakes
  • 2 tbsp fish sauce
  • 3 fresh red chillies, roughly chopped
  • 4 shallots, roughly chopped
  • 4 lemongrass stalks, bottom part only, roughly chopped
  • 30g fresh galangal, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 30g fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 1 tbsp ground turmeric
  • 2 tbsp shrimp paste
  • 25g peanuts
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil

To make the paste, simply whizz all of the ingredients in a food processor until you have a rough paste – add a little extra oil if you need to. I used my mini-chopped and found I had to do it in batches.

Recipe for the Laksa (serves 2)

  • 50g vegetable oil
  • Half quantity of the Laksa pasta, above
  • 2 skinless and boneless chicken thigh fillets
  • Tops of the lemongrass discarded when making the paste
  • Handful of raw prawns
  • 750ml chicken stock
  • 150ml coconut milk
  • 2 nests of dried rice noodles, cooked according to pack instructions
  • Bunch fresh mint, leaves only
  • 1 medium egg, boiled for 5 minutes (soft boiled) or 7 minutes (hard boiled), peeled
  • Handful of peanuts, roughly chopped
  • Lime wedges for garnish

Heat the oil in a wok frying pan over a medium heat. Add the laksa paste and reduce the heat to the lowest setting, and fry for at least 15 minutes, stirring from time to time. I try to fry for 30-40 minutes to really develop the flavour.

Put the chicken in a pan with half of the stock and the lemongrass, then simmer for 15 minutes until cooked through. Remove from the pan and allow to cool before slicing into strips. Add the raw prawns to the stock and cook for 2-3 minutes until cooked, then transfer to the plate with the chicken. Skim off the scum from the surface of the poaching liquid and discard the lemongrass, before adding the rest of the stock and the coconut milk.

Once the paste has cooked, add it to the stock and coconut mixture, and allow to simmer for 15 or so minutes before straining the broth through a sieve. Taste and season if necessary. Bring the broth back to the boil. Portion out the noodles, chicken and prawns into two bowls, and pour the boiling broth over the top. Sprinkle with mint leaves, chopped peanuts and a squeeze of lime, and finish with half of the boiled egg.

As you can probably tell, it does make a huge amount of washing up – but it’s well worth it! The flavours are insanely complex, I couldn’t quite believe I’d made it entirely from scratch. I’m not sure if my version is entirely authentic, but it tastes delicious and I’d happily eat bowl after bowl.

Are you a fan of cooking Asian food? What’s your go-to recipe?

Cooking From: Bolognese Baked Eggs (Toast Hash Roast Mash by Dan Doherty)

The subtitle of this book is “Real Food for Every Time of Day” – it’s the type of food Dan (executive chef of Duck & Waffle) likes to eat at home and, quite frankly, if he eats like this I’d be happy to move in with him tomorrow. This book is basically a book of comfort food under many guises – there’s pancakes, there’s things to top toast with, there’s sweet things, there’s savoury things. Most dishes are designed for breakfast or brunch, but can really be eaten any time of day.

Whilst we haven’t cooked that many dishes out of this book, it’s one we turn to again and again for inspiration. It’s a joy to read, one of those cookbooks that makes you feel cozy and comforted. In fact reading it again for this review made me realise just how many recipes I want to make!

Chapters are On Toast, Eggs, Hash, Eggs Over Easy, Pancakes, Hangover, Savoury, Sides & Salas, Sweets and Drinks. Basically there’s something for anyone, something for every occasion. There’s jams, homemade nutella, cocktails, instructions to make the best pancakes. And recipes I want to try? Around 99% of them! I won’t list every single one, but top of my list? Dan’s take on Egg’s Benedict featuring a saltbeef bagel and mustard hollandaise. It sounds amazing! The recipe for a Black Pudding Hash made with leftover roast potatoes sounds like the stuff of dreams. But it’s the Hangover chapter which really gets me excited. Scotch Bhaji (basically a scotch egg, with runny yolk, encased in an onion bhaji). The Patty Melt, merging a grilled cheese sandwich with a burger. I’m slobbering at the thought.

However it’s an altogether more simpler recipe I’m featuring here today, and one I’ve simplified even more from the book. Taken from the Eggs chapter, this recipe takes bolognese (see my tomato-free bolognese recipe here, but use your favourite), adds heat in the form of harissa, then nestles in lightly poached eggs, covers in cheese and then bakes. The result is a hug in a dish. It’s warming, spicy, gooey from the eggs, and perfect served with a mound of toast or some freshly baked pitta bread.

Recipe (Serves 2)

  • 2 generous portions of bolognese (I’d veer on the side of too much here!)
  • 1 tsp harissa, or more to taste
  • 4 eggs
  • 100g gruyere cheese

Simply heat the bolognese with the harissa until hot. Lightly poach the eggs until they are just firm enough to remove from the water. Spoon the bolognese mixture into a baking dish, nestle in the eggs and sprinkle over the cheese. Bake at 180C for around 5 minutes, or until the cheese is melted. Serve with plenty of bread for dipping.

It may not be in the hangover section, but I’d certainly be prepared to bet that this would  cure any hangover!

Are you a brunch fan? What’s your go-to at home weekend brunch?

Recipe: Lemon & Olive Oil Cake

Despite being a self-confession chocoholic, my go-to flavouring for a cake is lemon. There’s something about a zingy sponge, perhaps filled with a vibrant curd or topped with a crunchy drizzle glaze, that just makes my heart sing and tastebuds dance.

I usually make a lemon drizzle cake (recipe will be coming soon), but this is something a little different. This cake is smarter, it’s perfect for a dinner party dessert served with zest creme fraiche and raspberries, but it’s also delicious with a cup of tea. As it’s not too sweet, I confess I’ve also enjoyed it for a lazy weekend breakfast with some yoghurt! It’s a super moist cake with a tender crumb, a whack of lemony zing and subtle grassy flavours of olive oil.

Speaking of the olive oil, I used Terre Di San Vito*. I’ve been using this olive oil for the past month or two, and I have to say it’s good. It’s grassy and well-flavoured, without being overly harsh at the back of your throat. It makes wonderful salad dressings, and I’ve enjoyed far too much of it served simply with bread and some balsamic vinegar. Yum!

Back to the cake. It’s super simple to make, though does require some careful folding and a decent hand whisk or stand mixer. But really it’s hardly any effort at all, especially as I’ve simplified the method compared to many similar recipes I’d found – this gal ain’t got time for separating eggs and whisking whites and yolks individually!

Recipe (Makes 8 generous slices, 10 more dainty ones)

  • 5 medium eggs
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 120ml extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 1/2 tbsp lemon juice (roughly one lemon)
  • 125g plain flour, sifted
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • Zest of one lemon
  • 50g icing sugar, for dusting

Using stand mixer (you could do it by hand, but you’ll be exhausted afterwards), beat the eggs and sugar on high until the mixture is fluffy and has doubled in volume (it took just over 6 minutes in my KitchenAid). While the eggs and sugar are mixing, in a separate bowl measure the flour, baking powder, salt and lemon zest and whisk together.

Using a spatula, fold in the olive oil and lemon juice into the egg mixture, followed by the flour mixture. Fold until the flour disappears, but be careful not to overmix.

Pour the batter into a greased and lined 9 inch cake tin, and bake for 40-45 minutes at 175C until the top is a light golden brown and a skewed poked in comes out clean. Sift over some icing sugar before serving, to decorate.

Told you it was an easy cake recipe! I find this one is best eaten the day after baking, as it gets slightly more moister and almost sticky as it sits. I think it would be the perfect cake to take along to a summery BBQ…

*I received two bottles of Terre Di San Vito olive oil to promote on my Instagram page. No blog post was required, and all opinions are (as ever!) my own. No money exchanged hands in this collaboration. 

Have you ever tried baking with olive oil?

Recipe: 5-Ingredient Summer Vegetable Pasta with Lemon & Feta

You know me, I love a pasta dish if I’m in need of comfort food. Carbonara, Mac’n’Cheese, a big bowl of no-tomato Bolognese. All perfect comfort foods, but they can be a bit heavy and a bit too much to cook in the summer heat. No-one wants a pan of Bolognese simmering for 2 hours when it’s hot and sunny outside! This pasta dish is the perfect alternative.

The combination of the feta starting to melt into the hot pasta keeps the level of comfort food, yet the abundance of green vegetables and lemony flavours keep it summery. Some of the pasta is replaced with courgette, making the dish lighter, and the slight al dente texture of the peas adds another element.

In short, this is the perfect hot weather comfort food.

Recipe (serves 2)

  • 140g pasta, spaghetti or linguine works well here
  • 2-3 courgettes, peeled into strips with a vegetable peeler
  • 50g peas
  • 1 lemon, zest and juice
  • 25g feta

Cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet, adding the peas for the last 3-4 minutes. Drain, reserving a cup of the cooking water. Meanwhile spread the courgette strips out as much as possible onto a baking tray, season with a little salt and roast for 5-7 minutes at 180C.

Return the pasta and peas to their pan, and add the courgette along with a good grind of black pepper. Toss together, adding a little pasta water, then stir through the zest and juice of the lemon. Keep tossing togethe,r adding more water, until everything is evenly combined. Drizzle with a little olive oil, if you have any to hand, then pile into bowls and crumble over the feta.

A super easy pasta dish with summery flavours, ready in under 15 minutes. Perfect for hot evenings when you just want to be lazing around in the garden!

What’s your go-to pasta dish?

Cooking From: Homemade Pita Bread (James Morton’s Brilliant Bread)

Without a doubt, Brilliant Bread is my most recommended cookbook. It’s the one on my shelves that is well-thumbed, pages stiff with flour, faded with watermarks. If anyone, absolutely anyone, mentions baking their own bread to me I insist they purchase this book. It is quite simply the best book for bread making, both for beginners and beyond.

I could stop with the review and this post there, really, because I quite simply cannot sing James’ praises highly enough.

The writing style is a pleasure to read, it’s a book I can quite happily sit and cosy up with as much as bake from. He has such an excellent way of describing the bread-making process, in a way that’s both easy to understand but also extremely detailed. And the best bit? The majority of the recipes don’t require much, if any, kneading. Bread without having to get my hands dirty is a revelation, and this book alone is the reason I make my own bread so often.

Recipe (I get 10 pittas out of this, as I prefer mine slightly smaller, I quite often quarter or halve too for a small batch)

  • 200g strong white flour
  • 200g plain white flour
  • 8g salt
  • 8g yeast
  • 275g tepid water
  • flavourless oil for greasing

In a large bowl, weigh out the flour. With your fingers, rub in the salt at one edge of the bowl, and the sachet of dried yeast on the opposite side. Add the  water to the dry ingredients, and mix together until it forms a  dough (use your
dough to mop up any flour sticking to the side of the bowl). Cover your bowl with a damp tea towel
and rest in a warm place for about 45 minutes.

Oil the fingertips of one hand, and forcefully fold the dough in half inside the bowl. Turn the bowl a
quarter turn, and repeat until you have removed most of the air. Cover your bowl again rest the dough for another 45 minutes, whilst your oven preheats to it’s hottest temperature (around 250C).

Tip your dough out on to a lightly oiled surface and roll into a long sausage. Chop the dough into equal pieces (Jame’s suggests 8, I go for 10). Take each piece and, using a rolling pin, roll them out until they are about half a centimetre thick. Pop straight onto a baking tray and slide into the oven, turning down the temperature to 220C as soon as they are in. Bake for 8-12 minutes depending depending on how soft or crisp you like them. They should puff up into balls and are blush with a golden colour. But even if they don’t puff up, they’ll be delicious…

Other recipes inspired by Brilliant Bread are my Bagels (which I’m now desperately craving – there’s nothing better than a homemade bagel filled with pastrami and mustard!) and Focaccia.  And in short – I highly recommend that if you want to bake bread, you buy this book. You won’t regret it!

Are you a fan of baking your own bread?

Recipe: Spicy Lamb Sausage Rolls

Aren’t sausage rolls just the perfect party or picnic food?! I’m not talking about the dubious, slightly flabby ones you can buy in Greggs (although I have to admit I have been partial to one or two of those the morning after a heavy night!), but ones fresh from the oven. A really meat filling, full of flavour, with crispy pastry that’s as buttery as it is flaky.

These are just that bit more special. Instead of the more traditional pork filling I’ve used lamb mince, which I’ve spiced up with harissa. I’ve added other spices, plus some lemon zest to add some freshness. The lamb mince is bulked out with an egg and some breadcrumbs, as the true sausage roll isn’t *too* meaty. This keeps the filling nice and moist too. Now, W likes these hot and fresh from the oven, whilst I’m a fan of them cold the next day. Either way, they’re gorgeous with a salad on the side, and also alongside a soup. I can imagine they’d be perfect next to a tomato soup, damn you allergy!

These Spicy Lamb Sausage Rolls are just wonderful – comforting pastry combined with chilli heat. I know they will be featuring in many of our picnics this summer!

Recipe – makes 8 large sausage rolls, inspired by a Waitrose recipe

  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 2 tbsp harissa paste (I use this one, it’s super spicy!)
  • 1 regular pack of lamb mince, I used around 400g
  • 1 lemon, zest only
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 slice fresh bread, blitzed into breadcrumbs (around 40g worth)
  • 2 medium eggs
  • 1 sheet of ready-rolled pastry
  • Seeds – I used a mix of sesame and poppy – for scattering over the top

First off, fry the onion along with the fennel and cumin seeds in a little oil until soft, around 5 minutes. Add the garlic and the harissa and continue to fry for another few minutes. Allow to cool completely, before mixing together with the lamb mince, lemon zest, breadcrumbs, one of the eggs and some seasoning. You’ll need to get your hands dirty to make sure the mix is full combined.

Cut the pastry in half lengthways (so you have two long strips). Form the meat mixture into two long ‘sausages’ along the middle of each piece of pastry. Brush along one edge with pastry, then roll the other edge over the top of the meat and seal together – repeat with the other piece of pastry. Slice each roll into four, then brush with plenty of beaten egg, sprinkle with seeds and bake at 200C for around 25 minutes, or until golden and crispy.

These are delicious both warm and cold – perfect for an early summer picnic! Or an indoor picnic (as in these photos) if the British weather decides to be a tad wetter than ideal!

What picnic food are you partial to?

Recipe: Everyday Turkish Eggs (Poached Eggs with Warm Yoghurt and Chilli Butter Sauce)

If you follow me on Instagram (and if not, why not?!) then you’ll have seen me waxing lyrical over the last few months about my new favourite egg dish. Turkish Eggs.

I’d seen them popping up on a few brunch menus towards the end of last year, but it was only when we popped to The Dynamo for W’s birthday breakfast (see a previous review here) that I plucked up the courage to try something new. And, reader, I loved them. The combination of the thick, tangy, creamy yoghurt against perfectly poached eggs and spicy butter is so much tastier than I’d imagined. It all combines together to be more than the sum of it’s parts, a little bowl of tasty goodness that I’d happily have for breakfast any day of the week.

And I’ve come up with a method which means I can make these every day of the week. A relatively hands off method which means I can eat my favourite breakfast dish before work. Perfect!

Recipe (serves 1, makes enough chilli butter for 2-3 days)

  • 75g salted butter
  • 1 tsp chipotle paste
  • 1/2 tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 100g natural yoghurt
  • 2 eggs
  • Toast, to serve

To make the chilli butter, melt the butter in a small pan over a low heat with the chipotle paste and chilli flakes, stirring until it is well combined. Pour into some Tupperware and keep in the fridge.

When making your breakfast, heat the oven to around 75C. Add the yoghurt to a small baking dish or ovenproof bowl, and 2-3 tbsp of chilli butter to an ovenproof ramekin. Pop in the oven for 15 or so minutes, or until the butter is melted and the yoghurt is warm. Meanwhile poach the eggs to your liking (I use the clingfilm trick). Serve the eggs in the yoghurt, drizzled with the chilli butter, alongside some toast for dipping.

And that’s it! So easy, so quick and such a tasty breakfast that’s full of protein.

What’s your favourite breakfast dish?

Cooking From: Duck & Pineapple Tacos (Delicious Magazine)

Is it cheating, using a magazine as part of this cookery book series? Probably, but this recipe was too good not to share! We recently switched from subscribing to BBC GoodFood to Delicious magazine, and I have to say I’m really glad we did. We’d been unimpressed with GoodFood for a few months, finding the recipes a bit repetitive and predictable – and the ones we did try often didn’t work out so well. Since switching we’ve constantly found many recipes each month we’d like to make, and all of them have worked. Several of them have even been recooked, which is high, high praise in our house!

This is one such recipe. We’ve been loving Mexican flavours lately, whether it’s complex layers of flavour from authentic Pork Pibil Tacos, to cheats Fish Tacos made with Fish Fingers. These Duck Tacos are equally as good.

The duck legs are slow roasted in a mix of pineapple and chipotle, before being shredded and piled into tacos with a creamy yet spicy dressing. They are then topped with a tangy, fresh salsa of pineapple, red onion and chilli. It’s sweet, it’s hot, there’s crunch, there’s softness. The combination of flavours and textures in this dish is insanely good, and far superior than the effort required to put it together. I can imagine this would make a great informal supper party dish!

We’ve edited the recipe slightly, adding a little onion to the duck to (1) bulk it out a little and (2) had an additional level of flavour. We’ve simplified the creamy dressing, as we don’t tend to have mayonnaise on hand. We’ve added garlic, because why not. Oh, and whilst we usually leave out the avocado from the original I can imagine it would be delicious with it. And finally, we’ve used pre-prepared pineapple. Yes it’s more expensive, but it reduced the risk of me slicing my hand off, and I also tend to get sore hands if I handle the fruit. You can, of course, use a small pineapple here instead!

Recipe (serves 2, easily scaled up)

  • 1 duck leg
  • 1 white onion, sliced
  • 1 medium pack of prepared pineapple, 2/3 for the duck and 1/3 for the salsa
  • 75ml tequila or pisco
  • 75ml chicken stock
  • 2 tsp chipotle paste
  • Pinch of dried chilli flakes
  • For the salsa – 1 red onion, 1 red chilli, bunch fresh coriander (all three should be chopped) and 1/2 lime (zest and juice, serve with the remaining half)
  • For the chipotle sauce – 4 tbsp soured cream and 1 tsp chipotle paste
  • 4 soft tortillas, to serve

Heat a casserole dish over a medium heat, then add the duck legs (skin side down) and fry for 5 minutes until brown. Add the onion slices and fry briefly until softened. Blitz two-thirds of the pineapple in a blender (I used my mini-chopper) with the tequila, stock, chipotle paste, chilli flakes and salt/pepper to make a smooth sauce, then add to the duck. Put in the oven and cook at 160C for around 2 hours. Once done, shred the duck meat and add back to the sauce (discarding any bones and non-crisp skin).

For the pineapple salsa, finely dice the leftover pineapple and put in a bowl with the chopped red onion, lime zest, chillies and coriander. Add the juice of ½ lime, season and set aside. To make the chipotle sauce, mix together the soured cream and chipotle paste.

To serve, warm the tortillas (I use either a microwave or dry frying pan). Serve everything in small bowls, and assemble your tacos with the sauce, duck and salsa. Squeeze over a little extra lime before serving. Yum!

Are you a fan of Mexican food? Have you read Delicious magazine?

Recipe: Middle-Eastern Inspired Tahini Ice-Cream with Honey Caramel

When we have people round for supper (which is not as often as we’d like), one of my favourite desserts to make is brownie, ice-cream and some kind of sauce. It might sound kinda boring, but actually we switch up flavourings to go with the rest of our menu, and everything is homemade. We’ve done a Nutella-inspired hazelnut combination, a Snicker’s style dessert. And then there’s this. Slightly Middle-Eastern inspired, this tahini ice-cream is almost savoury with deep notes of sesame. Tempered with the exceedingly sweet and sticky honey caramel, it’s wonderful paired with a dark and gooey brownie.

I’ve already shared my ultimate brownie recipe, but today it’s the turn of one of our favourite ice-creams to date. It’s originally inspired by a Butterlust recipe (and in fact the honey caramel is largely unchanged – also the images on that post are insanely gorgeous!).

Using tahini in an ice-cream might seem a little odd, as it is one of the most savoury things I’ve tasted. However it produces the creamiest ice-cream I’ve ever tried, with a slow melt that coats the mouth. Combined with honey both in the ice-cream base and the caramel, it’s the perfect salty-sweet combination. I personally wouldn’t eat this ice-cream without the caramel (unless you added extra sweetness to the base), but give it a go and see what you think!

Tahini Ice-Cream Recipe (makes around 4 servings)

  • 100g tahini
  • 100g honey
  • 400ml milk
  • 100ml double cream
  • 1tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 egg yolks (from medium eggs)

Place the tahini and honey in a large saucepan and stir over medium-low heat until melted and combined. Remove from the heat and allow to cool for a few minutes, then stir in the milk and cream gradually.

Beat the egg yolks and vanilla in a small bowl and stir in two tablespoons of tahini mixture until well combined. Add this eggy mixture to the saucepan, and return to a very low heat. Gently cook, stirring constantly, for five minutes until thickened. Allow to cool, stirring occasionally to prevent a skin forming, then transfer to an ice-cream machine and churn as per the machine’s instructions before popping in the freezer.

If you don’t have an ice-cream machine, pour the cooled mixture into a freezeable container and freeze, whisking every half an hour, for three hours. As a word of advice, this ice-cream does freeze quite solidly so I’d recommend removing from the freezer a good 10 minutes before scooping.

Honey Caramel Recipe (enough for four servings, baked on Butterlust’s Recipe)

  • 250g honey
  • 125ml double cream
  • 15g salted butter

Combine the honey and cream in a large saucepan over medium heat and cook, stirring frequently, until the mixture reaches 110C on a sugar thermometer. Immediately remove from heat and stir in the butter, then allow to cool before serving. Blast in a microwave if you need to soften it to a pouring consistency.

Serve the tahini ice-cream and honey caramel with  gooey chocolate brownie (slightly warm), scattered with chopped pistachios. It’s creamy, it’s rich, it’s delicious – and it’s the perfect end to a slightly Middle-Eastern inspired dinner party.

Do you have a go-to dessert to serve to guests?

Recipe: Staple Storecupboard Stir-Fry with a Soy, Ginger & Peanut Butter Sauce

A stir-fry is such a staple for us. We usually have it on a Monday night, using the leftover meat from the Sunday Roast the evening before, but it’s equally good without any meat, or using meat bought especially for a stir-fry (I have a massive soft spot for a prawn stir-fry).

A stir-fry is, for is, the ultimate in fast and healthy cooking. Yes, there’s a fair bit of chopping involved but once that’s all done it can be cooked in five minutes flat. And if we’re really short on time you can buy those bags of pre-prepped veggies, making it even quicker.

This particular stir-fry sauce is my favourite. It’s made using only store cupboard ingredients (although of course you could use fresh ginger and chillies if you had them) and so we can make it pretty much any time we need to. The sauce is also fantastic tossed through plain noodles (no veg) if you’re sick which is a bonus!

Recipe (serves 1)

  • 1 small onion, finely sliced
  • 1 carrot, spiralized, or peeled into strips with a vegetable peeler
  • 1/4 of a small cabbage (I like using either savoy or red), sliced finely
  • 1/2 a pepper, sliced
  • Other veggies – I like to add mushrooms, kale, beansprouts etc, but it really depends what I have in the fridge
  • Handful of leftover meat, if using (in the photos I had leftover roast chicken to add)
  • 1 tsp peanut butter
  • 1 tsp sesame oil, if you have it
  • 1/2 tsp runny honey
  • 2-3 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp lime juice (I usually keep a bottle in the fridge)
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • Pinch dried chilli flakes, more if you want it hotter
  • 1 nest of egg noodles, or rice, to serve (I’m a noodle girl!)

Stir fry the veggies (and meat) to your liking. I usually like to soften the onions first on a lower heat, before stir-frying the rest on a higher heat (adding the carrots towards the end) as I’m not a fan of crunchy onions. Cook the rice or noodles according to pan instructions.

In a small bowl or mug, combine the peanut butter, sesame oil and runny honey. Gradually add the soy and lime juice, mixing constantly, until you have a smooth sauce. Stir through the ginger and chilli. Once the veg is almost done, add the sauce to the wok and continue to stir-fry until everything is hot and cooked. Serve on a bed of rice or noodles.

And that’s is – super-easy, super-quick and super-tasty!

Are you a stir-fry fan?