Baking: Grandma’s Treacle Tart

Quite a fussy child, when my grandma brought out cakes to go with tea when we visited, I’d only go for two options. If there weren’t there, I’d go hungry. Actually that fussiness hasn’t completely gone away, as the texture of any dried fruit is still a no-go for me – which means no fruit cake, no mince pies, no Christmas pudding, you get the jist. Anyway, I’d either eat jam tarts, or treacle tarts. To this day Grandma’s Treacle tart is one of the best I’ve eaten, and I think I’ve finally managed to replicate it.

 photo 150544d1-991c-40a6-be3c-c0aed1be8d5c_zps2b5ce75d.jpgIt’s quite a bit denser than your traditional Treacle tart, and is best served gently warmed. If you want a gooey, looser filling, simply leave out the oats. I personally prefer it, it’s a bit more substantial, and keeps me from getting a major sugar rush. Perfect with cream, even better with ice cream, this one is a winner for a cold Autumn or Winter night…which is exactly why I’m entering it into Topps Tiles A/W14 National Baking Week Challenge. A few bloggers were hand-picked to enter, and sent some gorgeous baking goodies (currently at my home;¬†I couldn’t quite carry them on the train) and then told to post on this week. Here’s mine, fingers crossed as I know my mum would love to new tiles, and I definitely wouldn’t say no to a Kitchen Aid…

 photo 0e317927-29b0-4ab8-977d-510db4f8226d_zpsb770a9bc.jpgRecipe

  • Pastry case – you could try making my pastry here, replacing any salt/pepper/herbs with a little sugar. Blind bake, cool, then fill. Alternatively buy read rolled and blind bake, or even a ready made pastry case. The steps in this recipe assumes you’ve got a pastry case all ready.
  • 400g golden syrup – I bought a 450g tin and just left a spoonful for porridge the next day
  • Zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 80g breadcrumbs, which I found was roughly 1 rolls worth
  • 2 tablespoons of oats

 photo 6c1326b7-22dd-421a-9bda-1749b349d6b0_zps526a45a0.jpgPreheat your oven to 160g. Grate your lemon zest into a bowl, and pour over the golden syrup.

 photo b2b7d888-8500-40ee-a350-621b08c0d2e0_zpsa1d669bb.jpg photo 0b78cf1a-8444-4d29-a854-66f0919cd762_zpsd8e289b3.jpgStir in your lemon juice and your breadcrumbs/oats. Stir well, until it is all combined. The mix should be thick, but still able to ‘move,’ i.e. when you pour it into the pastry it should spread itself to the edges.

 photo 96f0caff-20bf-4932-a46f-982e678641f4_zps1c1b7f9c.jpgAdd to the pastry case, and then bake for 20-30 minutes until golden brown. Keep an eye to make sure that the top doesn’t catch – you may want to lower the heat.

 photo 6a831efd-b8a2-4816-9b59-ada55a97ce6a_zpsba7cee49.jpgThe mix will be quite wobbly and ‘wet’ when you fetch it out – it will firm up on cooling. Enjoy slightly warm (the microwave does this perfectly) with cream or ice cream.

 photo 7d706961-68c8-4d60-9278-a58b7b2a603d_zpsf42b6d25.jpgI absolutely love this bake, warm and comforting, and ridiculously simple to make. I’ll never buy one in again – even with buying a pastry case the ingredients are far less science-lab, and there’s something so lovely about the smell of it cooking too. One of life’s greatest pleasure, and I’m very thankful for my Grandma for introducing me to her recipe.

What’s your favourite comforting bake for cold weather?

Baking: Cherry Bakewell Tart

I’m not a huge jam-lover, but I do love it in bakes and when I was sent a selection of conserves from Mackays new Hand Stirred range¬†arrived my whole family was instantly clamouring about what to make first. In the end my parents vote won, and a Bakewell Tart was made up with the Cherry Conserve*.

 photo 2014-07-26184519_zps1a23b789.jpgCompletely different to the kind found in packets (covered in icing with a glace cherry on top!), proper bakewell tart is crisp pastry spread with jam, and topped with an almond filling which is then baked. Pretty simple, but it looks spectacular. I’m afraid I have no pictures of the making process as my dad actually did the baking for this one; I was busy packing ready for the start of my placement year!

 photo 2014-07-26184624_zps9403d933.jpgIngredients

  • Pastry case – we used a ready rolled sheet of pastry, but adapt this recipe here by replacing the savoury ingredients with a spoonful of sugar if you want to make your own!
  • 2 tablespoons of cherry jam or conserve
  • 1/2 cup each of – butter, caster sugar, and ground almonds
  • 1 egg
  • Almond extract (if you have it, we didn’t!)
  • A handful of flaked almonds

 photo 2014-07-26184605_zpsf3376978.jpgHow to make Bake!

First you want to prep your pastry case. Line your chosen flan dish with the pastry, and blind bake; top with baking paper, fill with baking beans and bake for 10 mins, then remove the beans/paper and continue until golden and crisp. Let cool, then spread the pastry with the jam. Use more/less depending on your judgement!

Now for the almond filling. Melt the butter, and then let cool slightly. Stir in the sugar, followed by the ground almonds, egg and extract. Pour into the pastry case, scatter over the flaked almonds, and bake at 200C for 30-35 mins, covering in things are browning too quickly. There’s no pictures of the inside of our tart as it was slightly underbaked, but still pretty yummy!

 photo 2014-07-26184528_zps5a730d9f.jpgAs for the jam, the unanimous decision was that it was nice, but nothing special. It didn’t seem to have much of a definitive cherry flavour, and instead just tasted of a generic fruit jam. Perhaps a little disappointing, but it was well-rounded with a good balance of sharp and sweet. The texture was also pretty spot on – thick and sticky, but not dry. A bugbear of mine is runny jam, so even for someone on the gate about jam this was pretty good! I’m looking forward to baking with the other flavours – raspberry next!

What do you like to bake with jam?