Recipe: One-Pan Cauliflower Salad for my #YearofVeganLunchboxes Challenge [AD – gifted]

One of the main things I’ve learnt so far on my #YearofVeganLunches challenge is that I need to get some decent variety of base carb in. Sure I could eat orzo most weeks, but it’s not the most nutritious of choices. Quinoa is great, but my digestive system doesn’t seem to want it to often. Couscous is just plain boring to have more often than monthly. Right now I have a bit of a thing for bulgur wheat – and this recipe shows it off wonderfully.

 photo Cauliflower Salad_zpsjybqtm09.jpg photo Cauliflower Salad  5_zpsewzuyajs.jpgAnd to be honest the star of the show really is the cauliflower anyway. Roasted to perfection so it’s tender, slightly charred and almost nutty, and basted in plenty of ginger, garlic and za’tar to make it sing. You may think you hate cauliflower but this recipe may make you think again. The best thing, though, is that it’s just so EASY. A few minutes of chopping and then it happily sits in the oven all in one dish, before being drenched in lemon juice. It’s wonderful warm (and if you’re not vegan I highly recommend sprinkling with a spot of feta in that case) but just as good cold with some almonds for additional crunch. Next time I’m going to whip up a quick tahini dressing to serve on the side I think, but it was delicious just as written too. And super easy too…

 photo Cauliflower Salad  12_zpslfxfwnzx.jpg photo Cauliflower Salad  15_zpstcqpk9jx.jpg photo Cauliflower Salad  11_zps2jyj7zdj.jpg photo Cauliflower Salad  13_zpsmqcfntjw.jpgAll-in-one-tin recipes are my thing right now, whether it’s for lunch prep or dinners. I have every single one of Rukmini Iyer’s Roasting Tin books and her latest release, The Quick Roasting Tin, is my favourite. In it is a Thyme & Sesame Cauliflower Tabbouleh which inspired this recipe – but to be honest I can see myself cooking my way through the book. And to make it even easier, Harts of Stur sent me over some of the Pyrex Cook & Go storage range. These make meal prep SO easy, I’m already tempted to order more. We have a couple of the small and medium boxes and they are SO useful. I can cook a batch of a one-pan meal, let it cool then pop the lid on and whack it in the fridge. The smaller ones I’ll then just take to work the next day. For a recipe like this the medium sized box we have is a little too small for the full recipe, so we split the amounts in half and roasted each separately. This worked quite well as we had half for dinner with feta, and then was able to stir the watercress and radishes through the cooled lunch serving before storing overnight. Having said that one of the large boxes is definitely going on my wishlist!

Recipe (serves 4 generously, adapted from The Quick Roasting Tin)

  • 150g bulgur wheat
  • 300-350ml of vegetable stock (suitable for vegans if necessary)
  • 1 large red onion, finely sliced
  • 3cm fresh ginger, peeled and grated
  • 2 tbsp za’tar, plus an addtional tsp to sprinkle at the end
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 large cauliflower – leaves roughly chopped, and florets separately (and chopped into small pieces)
  • 2 lemons, zest and juice
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • Around 8 radishes, sliced thinly
  • 1 bag of watercress, roughly chopped
  • a few handfuls of baby spinach
  • a handful of blanched almonds
  • Feta to serve (optional)

Tip the bulgur wheat into the roasting tin and pour over the stock. Scatter over the onion and cauliflower leaves. In a bowl, rub the olive oil, ginger, garlic and za’tar over the cauliflower florets, then scatter into the roasting tin. Pop the tin into the oven and roast at 200C for 20-30 minutes or until the cauliflower is tender and the bulgur wheat is cooked – start with only 300ml of stock and add a little more mid-way through cooking if needed. Remove from the oven and stir through the lemon zest and juice, watercress and radishes. Serve scattered with almonds, extra za’tar and feta (if using).

If using for a lunch, allow the roasted mix to cool before stirring through the extras, I recommend adding a little extra olive oil too. I imagine this would also be amazing scattered with some pomegranate seeds too!
 photo Cauliflower Salad  7_zps01vjclvz.jpg

 What is your go-to lunchbox?

Recipe: Spring Vegetable Pasta Salad #YearOfVeganLunches

In all honesty? I’m a little surprised I’m still going with this whole ‘year of vegan lunches’ challenge – I was expecting to get fed up/bored/stuck for ideas by now and revert to throwing feta or tzatziki at everything (although I’m determined to find a decent vegan recipe for the latter as it’s a big staple for me during summer). But it’s been a tad easier than I was expecting. Bean stews, chickpea soups, quinoa salad (recipe as linked might need a slight adjustment to be fully vegan). A Deliciously Ella potato and lentil dish.

 photo Vegan Spring Vegetable Salad_zpsgqtcikyi.jpgThe only thing is these recipes all tend to be quite hearty and warming, with the exception of the salad. And when the weather gets slightly warmer I’m not really feeling a comforting stew – and I also need options I can eat at my desk without needing to use the canteen microwaves (because unfortunately there are some times when I can go weeks without leaving my desk at lunchtime). Pasta salads were a go to when I wasn’t eating vegan, so I’ve been working on adapting some of my favourites and creating new ones. And this one is a winner.

 photo Spring Green Pasta Salad  11_zpst3vwhb80.jpg photo Spring Green Pasta Salad  5_zpsgkkzuood.jpg photo Spring Green Pasta Salad  9_zpsuehjl0tv.jpgPlenty of pasta (because carbs), and even more crisp green veggies. Handfuls of whatever summery herb I have lying around. A bright and zippy lemon dressing. Perhaps some crunch from almonds or pistachios. Protein in the form of chickpeas (pictured plate is lacking them due to a storecupboard/shopping list error). It’s carby plant-based goodness,vibrant and can be adapted to (1) whatever is seasonal and (2) whatever is in your fridge. The dressing also keeps beautifully in a jar and has become my go-to dressing whenever plain leaves seem a little boring. So make extra.

I’ve used a combination of lightly cooked peas and other veggies and some raw sugarsnap peas – I just love these raw as the texture and flavor is so fresh. If you prefer them softer just blanch along with the frozen peas.

 photo Spring Green Pasta Salad  13_zpseroyruko.jpg photo Spring Green Pasta Salad  10_zpslquvubib.jpg photo Spring Green Pasta Salad  7_zpszq7len7v.jpgRecipe (makes 2 days worth of generous lunches for the two of us)

  • 200g small-shaped pasta – orzo works particular well
  • 100g frozen peas
  • 100g broad beans, blanched and podded (if you’re not keen then double up the peas)
  • 100g sugarsnap peas, thinly sliced lengthways
  • 1 tin chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 bunch of spring onions, finely sliced
  • 100g radishes, finely sliced
  • 1 handful of fresh herbs – mint, parsley, basil and dill all work well, a mixture works best but go with what you have
  • To serve – handful salad leaves (spinach is particularly good), some chopped nuts (almonds or pistachios work super well) or seeds
  • For the dressing – 3 lemons (zest and juice), 75ml oil (I used a roughly half-and-half mixture of olive and vegetable), 1 tsp of maple syrup (or honey depending on how you stand), 1 tsp Dijon mustard, plenty of salt and pepper
  • Other possible additions: grilled courgette slices, roasted broccoli, blanched asparagus

First up, prep the dressing. Simply pop all of the ingredients into a small blender (I used our mini chopper) and whizz until fully combined. If you are doing by hand just whisk really well. Taste and adjust the seasoning if needed.

Then cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet, adding the frozen peas for the last two minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water, then transfer to a large non-metal bowl or some Tupperware. Add in the dressing, vegetables and herbs and toss together. Serve at room temperature with extra salad leaves and some chopped nuts.

 photo Spring Green Pasta Salad  2_zpsyeybcqgu.jpg photo Spring Green Pasta Salad  6_zps8b7fxlzh.jpgThis is honestly the perfect at-desk lunch – fresh and tasty, light enough to avoid the post-eating slump and can be transferred plate to mouth with one hand (great for super busy days!). Did I mention that its delicious?! I know it will be a regular feature in my lunchbox over the next few months…

Do you have a go-to pasta salad recipe?

Recipe: Vegan Chocolate Cake

This year was the year that I planned to do *all* the Easter baking. The first Easter weekend in four years that wasn’t immediately before an exam period, the first time I could actually enjoy the bank holiday without feeling guilty. I wanted to make Hot Cross Buns, bread, fancy-pants lamb dishes, and I had a real desire to make Lemon-y cookies. I managed to do exactly none of that.

 photo Vegan Chocolate Cake_zpsjipcyg4w.jpgI could make excuses (and to be fair, it was too hot to be inside baking over the Bank Holiday weekend!) but in all honesty? I couldn’t be bothered. It was the first time in what felt like a long time that I could truly relax, and I just wanted to sit. To read a book without feeling guilty. Have a bath without taking study notes with me. To binge watch something anything (Fleabag was the series of choice, SO good!). Baking was quite far down on the list, and so this was the only thing that I made.

A birthday cake for my dad, veganised so my sister could enjoy it. Chocolate-y because it was Easter after all. If it hadn’t have been a birthday cake I probably would have decorated with mini-eggs. And, y’ano, vegan.

As far as vegan cakes go, this one is pretty “normal” – there’s no weird substitute ingredients, no flaxseed pretending to be egg. I don’t have anything against those ingredients, but I also don’t tend to find that they necessarily work in the way they are intending, and I find getting them evenly incorporated in to get an even rise quite tricky. So this is pretty basic. Milk and butter swapped out for plant-milk (we used Oatly) and Flora spread. It works. It rises (to the point we did have to prise one layer off the over rack above). It’s light and airy and tasty. The buttercream is rich and chocolately and indulgent. Even better was this stayed fresh (covered with an upturned salad bowl…) for a good few days, which I was quite impressed by. My only criticism is that it was super-crumbly and so virtually impossible to slice neatly.

 photo Vegan Chocolate Cake 18_zpspwtpjlky.jpg photo Vegan Chocolate Cake 13_zpsc3boeqhz.jpgIngredients (makes an 8 inch sponge, giving 10 generous slices)

  • 300ml vegan milk
  • 1 tbsp white vinegar (we used apple cider as that’s what was lying around)
  • 150g vegan spread (we used Flora)
  • 60g golden syrup
  • 1 tsp instant coffee
  • 275g plain flour
  • 170g sugar
  • 4 tbsp cocoa powder (we used raw cacao powder)
  • 2.5 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • For enough frosting for the middle/top – 75g vegan spread (again, Flora worked fine), 180g icing sugar, 4 tbsp cocoa powder, 2 tbsp vegan milk

Stir the vinegar into the milk and set aside, stirring every so often. Some plant milks will thicken and slightly curdle which is fine (this is the same as turning dairy milk into buttermilk) however oat milk is unlikely to do this! In a pan over a low heat, melt the spread, golden syrup and coffee granules together. I added a tiny splash of boiling water to encourage the coffee to dissolve. Along to cool slightly, then stir in the milk mixture.

Weigh the flour, cocoa, sugar, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) into a large mixing bowl and whisk together – whisking will incorporate some air without the need for sifting.  Gradually pour the milk and melted margarine mixture over the flour mixture and stir well until it becomes a smooth batter.

Divide the mixture between two greased and line sandwich tins (8 inches in diameter) and bake for around 30 minutes or until an inserted skewer comes out clean. I found that these did crack a little, but as you’re piling on the buttercream it doesn’t matter!

Allow the cakes to cool completely on a wire rack before making the buttercream. Beat the spread in a bowl until soft and creamy, then add in half of the icing sugar and beat until smooth. Add the rest of the icing sugar and the cocoa powder and beat until smooth and thick, then gradually beat in up to 2 tbsp of milk (you may not need it all) until the icing is a soft and spreadable consistency. Spread over the top of one cake, sandwich the other on top, and spread the rest of the icing on top. If you want to add icing on the sides, I’d multiply all of the buttercream ingredients by 1.5(ish).
 photo Vegan Chocolate Cake 3_zpsatde0rhb.jpg

Did you do any baking over the Bank Holiday weekend? Are there any other vegan bakes you’d like to see?

Recipe: Vegan Chickpea Soup with Lemon & Tahini

When I first posted a picture of this on Instagram and described it as ‘warm hummus in soup form’ it pretty much instantly became my most-requested recipe. And I can’t say I’m surprised. This is beyond a doubt my favourite recipe of 2019 so far.

 photo Chickpea Soup_zpsbtqintk1.jpg photo Chickpea Tahini Soup 22_zpsbcynipvx.jpgOriginally a “this is vegan, let’s make it for lunch” decision from one of my soup books, I’ve twisted up the recipe a bit and it’s become something we make every few weeks, something I crave if we go too long without it. It also freezes well, so I quite like to have a couple of portions stashed away too. It’s every bit as addictive as I find hummus to be, but even easier to eat a giant bowl of it. Creamy and comforting enough for winter, yet it’s citrus-y and bright enough that I’d happily eat it in warmer months too. The lemon and mint adds freshness, the tahini makes it so moreish, and there’s just a small hint of chilli heat. Whether you’re vegan or not, this soup is a one I highly recommend you try out.

The recipe here makes around 6 really generous portions. Yes, it’s a *lot* of chickpeas but this really is a meal in a bowl. You could add some pitta on the side if you wanted, but personally I find a steaming bowl of this good enough.

 photo Chickpea Tahini Soup 2_zpsnczdpbhq.jpg photo Chickpea Tahini Soup 5_zpsmhclfgmz.jpg photo Chickpea Tahini Soup 8_zps4lmabukg.jpgRecipe

  • 250g dried chickpeas, soaked overnight
  • 2 large onions
  • 4 large carots
  • 4 celery sticks
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 3 litres of vegan-friendly stock
  • 3 tbsp tahini, or more/less to taste
  • 2 tsp dried mint
  • 1 tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 2 tins chickpeas
  • Spring onions, to serve

First up, roughly chop your onion, celery and carrots and allow to sweat in a very large casserole dish with some olive oil until starting to soften. Drain your soaked chickpeas, briefly rinse and add to the vegetables along with the garlic. Cover with as much stock as you can fit into the pan, bring to the boil and then allow to simmer over a low heat for around 2 hours, topping up the stock occasionally. When the vegetables and chickpeas are soft allow to cool slightly, then whizz with a stick blender until thick and creamy.

Stir in the mint, spices and tahini, then taste and adjust seasonings. Drain the tinned chickpeas and add to the soup, then reheat before serving scatted with some sliced spring onions. You could also stir through some chopped fresh herbs – mint, coriander and parsley all work well.

 photo Chickpea Tahini Soup 6_zpsopjkfaak.jpg photo Chickpea Tahini Soup 18_zpsxwnxtpg2.jpgBlending up the chickpeas makes this SO creamy and rich, it’s hard to believe that it’s completely dairy-free. In fact I’m already working on ways I can adapt this recipe for other flavour combinations, so watch this space…

Are you a soup fan?

Food: My #YearofVeganLunches Challenge

I’ve mentioned this more on my Instagram grid that on here, but one of my goals for the year is to aim to make all of my lunchboxes vegan throughout the year. I’m doing this for a few reasons – but mainly to prove a point after someone mockingly bet me I couldn’t eat many vegan dishes. I’m stubborn, me. It’s also to cut down on the amount of meat I eat, although a lot of my lunchboxes were veggie anyway, and to remove the unnecessary cheese. Lunch looks a bit boring, add a generous helping of feta. Pasta? Grate half a block of Parmesan on it. You get the picture.

 photo Vegan Lunches_zpsdg4bkab1.jpgThat said, I’m not being overly strict. I don’t want to end up dreading lunchtime and craving the canteen’s chips instead. I don’t want to give up on this challenge a few months in. And so it’s onto the self-imposed ‘rules’…

  • The challenge is for lunchboxes only, which means eating out, weekends and study days tend not to fall under the challenge. I’ve actually found myself picking more vegan options on these days anyway, but I needed to lift the restriction when eating out as vegan + tomato allergy ain’t as easy as you’d imagine!
  • Ignore pasta, as long as the sauces and accompaniments are vegan. I know you can get vegan pasta, but we have so much of it anyway (as we buy in bulk) so I’m not sweating it for this challenge. As long as I don’t serve up a mac’n’cheese (with proper milk/cheese!) I kinda feel that’s okay! Though I do have some vegan chickpea pasta to try out from my latest Degustabox (gifted) so we’ll see how that goes…
  • Avoiding waste trumps this challenge. Whilst I’m no longer creating my lunchboxes around planned leftovers (they go into dinners instead) I will still refuse to see waste just because ‘its not vegan’ if it can otherwise be thrown into my lunchbox. Case in point was a delicious yoghurt based dressing from a Taco Salad (this recipe) a few weeks ago. It went wonderfully over the bean mix I had in my lunchbox that week, but would have ended up down the drain if not. Likewise if there’s a bit of feta going to waste in the fridge (because it comes in packs that are generally far too big) then I would sooner eat it in a lunch than throw it out!
  • No meat substitutes (and I’m not crazy about the amount of sugar in the Oatly cream and creme fraiche substitutes either…). Though I have to say I’m curious about pulled peas…

And so far, this approach is working out really well for me. I’ve had some damn tasty lunches – highlights have been a mushroom and lentil stew/soup combo (I’ve since re-made this as more of a stew with borlotti beans and leeks and have five portions stashed in the freezer), an amaaaazzzzing chickpea soup with tahini and a surprisingly tasty throw-together salad of lentils, kale and roasted broccoli. The sort of thing I’d have thrown feta on top of without a moments thought, but actually was all the better without it.

Have you tried going vegan, or eating more vegan options?

Recipe: Vegan Lentil & Mushroom ‘Stoup’

What makes the difference between a stew or casserole and a soup? I like to think it’s a fine line, and this ‘stoup’ kinda sits in the middle. You can add more stock or some vegan milk to thin it down for a soup, or blend it up more and reduce it for a stew-type dish. Whichever you choose, it’s absolutely delicious and I think one of my favourite winter lunches.

 photo Mushroom Lentil Soup_zpslbz1od61.jpgIt’s creamy, it’s comforting, real soul food. It’s garlick-y and slighty herby. There’s a kick of black pepper and a slight tang from a splash of vinegar. It’s not vinegar-y as such, but it helps to add a little bit of complexity that makes this really feel like a meal, and not just something you’ve thrown together. Add some toast or a bit of sourdough bread and this is a real hug in a bowl.

It’s also vegan! If you follow me on Instagram you’ll know I’ve set myself a challenge in 2019 to make as many of my lunchboxes as possible vegan. I’m not constraining myself too much by this, and if I’ve got meat or dairy that needs using then it will be thrown in, but I’d like to keep the majority of them vegan. And frankly, if they all taste as good as this it will be an easy job. If you’re not vegan, however, additions which could work well would be bacon (always), or simmer with a parmesan rind to add some extra flavour.

 photo Vegan Mushroom and Lentil Soup 10_zpsethbwgep.jpgIngredients (makes 4 lunch-time servings)

  • 150g dried Puy lentils
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 1 pack of mushrooms mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
  • 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
  • 1 cup vegan-friendly stock
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened plant-based milk—I used Oat milk

First up, cook your lentils. I tend to add boiling water and bring to a rolling boil, before reducing the heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Add plenty of salt, cook for another five minutes and then drain.

Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a medium pan and cook the shallots until slightly softened and translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the sliced mushrooms to the pot, turn up the heat and stir fry for a few minutes. Add the garlic and thyme, and continue to try for 1 minute before adding the vinegar. Stir until evaporated, then add the drained lentils, vegetable stock and  milk to the pot. Stir and bring to a boil, before using a stick blender to whizz to your desired consistency. Add more milk or stock if you want a soup, or reheat and simmer until thick and stew-like. Check for seasoning, adding plenty of black pepper.

Serve hot with toast or bread. I also like to stir through some spinach – for lunchboxes I add a cube or two of frozen spinach in the morning before I leave the house.

 photo Vegan Mushroom and Lentil Soup 8_zpsdzcibo5b.jpgFor something so quick the result is so flavourful and cosy – it does taste as though it’s been simmering away for hours. It also makes my flat smell super good, so I’m down with that…

Do you have any lunchbox friendly vegan recipes?

Recipe: Vegan Coconut & Lime Ice-Cream

In case you haven’t heard, it’s been HOT in London over the last few days weeks months. It certainly feels like months now! The heatwave well and truly set in around June time, and it seems as though it’s here to stay. Luckily we’ve had a bit of rain and a few days of cooler weather just to remind us we are in the UK, but otherwise it’s been a solid few months of sunshine, sweaty Tube journeys and hiding in each shady spot we find. And eating ice-cream. Lots of ice-cream.

 photo Vegan Coconut IceCream_zps5tu770nn.jpgI’ve been trying to make homemade ice-cream a little more often this summer. I mean, given we have an ice-cream maker (the KitchenAid attachment) we have no excuse! We’ve found it so fun creating our favourite flavours, including an amazing brown-butter caramel drizzle (so, so good!) – but this is the first non-traditional one we’ve tried. We usually make an egg-custard base and go from there, but this is a cheat which involves no heat at all (which is wonderful, really, given it’s been too hot to consider cooking and baking recently). It’s super-simple, super-easy and only takes a few ingredients. Add in some of your time (most of it is spent waiting at the freezer until it’s ready!) and you’ve got some delicious vegan ice-cream that’s the perfect combination of indulgently creamy and refreshingly lime-y.

I’m not at all claiming that this is ‘healthy’ ice-cream, it’s still got heck of a lot of sugar and fat in it, but it does make my tummy happier than your standard dairy ice-cream whilst still being just as creamy and delicious. I also find the zingy-ness of the lime makes it super-refreshing and thirst-quenching, ideal on a hot day!

 photo Vegan Coconut and Lime Ice-Cream6_zpsnexmaszs.jpg photo Vegan Coconut and Lime Ice-Cream10_zpsddzzwabm.jpgRecipe (makes around 6 greedy servings)

  • 400ml coconut milk, shaken well
  • 2 limes, zest and juice
  • 60g sugar, caster is best here as it dissolves easier
  • Optional – some vegan yoghurt, just to increase the creaminess slightly

This recipe is really easy – simply mix all of the ingredients together, making sure the sugar is fully dissolved. Chill for thirty minutes, then churn in your ice-cream machine until frozen and ice-cream-like (around 20 minutes). Freeze until needed, and serve with extra lime zest. It’s also great served with gingerut biscuits!

If you don’t have an ice-cream maker, chill for around 3-4 hours, whisking every half an hour, then freeze until needed.

 photo Vegan Coconut and Lime Ice-Cream7_zpswdltgpal.jpgThis has become a real favourite recipe, and now I’m itching to try other coconut milk ice-creams. Next I’ll be doing a chocolate version, which I’m hoping will be like a frozen Bounty bar!

Have you tried making your own ice-cream?

Recipe: Vegan Keralan Curry with Cauliflower, Chickpeas & Pineapple

This is one of my all-time favourite curry recipes – full of fragrant flavours, packed with nutrients and veggies, and (best of all!) ready in around half an hour. It’s adapted from one of Jamie’s 15 Minute Meals, though I don’t have the equipment nor the brain speed to make it in that time.

This is a pretty typical Keralan Curry, although I make no claims that it is authentic. It is lighter and fresh in flavour, and more vibrant in texture than a North Indian curry – and as such it is less complex to make. It does need a couple of spices that might not be in everyone’s cupboard, but actually we find that we do use these quite often in curries.

And if you fancy skipping the vegan/veggie element, this curry sauce is amazing made with prawns or white fish – though I’d fry off an onion or a couple of shallots for a bit more texture. I’m also tempted to play around with different veggies, I can imagine it would be delicious with some sweet potato!

Recipe – 2 dinner portions plus 2 lunches, or 3 for dinner (easily scaled up, we’ve made for 8 before)

  • ½ cauliflower
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • Drizzle of vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 2 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • 2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 handful of dried curry leaves
  • 7 cm piece of ginger
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 6 spring onions
  • 1 fresh red chilli
  • 1 big bunch of fresh coriander
  • 1 tin coconut milk
  • 1 tin (400g) chickpeas
  • 1 tin (227g) pineapple in juice
  • 1 lemon

Remove the outer leaves from the cauliflower, then chop into small chunks and place on a baking tray. Drizzle with a little vegetable oil, then roast at 180C for around 10-15 minutes, or until lightly charred and starting to go tender.

Melt the coconut oil in a large pan, then quickly stir in the mustard and fenugreek seeds, turmeric and curry leaves. Peel the ginger and garlic , and trim the spring onions. Pulse these, together with the chilli and coriander stalks in a food processor (I used a mini chopper) until they form a rough pasta, then stir into the spices. Add the coconut milk, drained chickpeas and the pineapple chunks (plus the juice from the pineapple).

When the cauliflower is cooked as above, add this to the curry and bring the whole thing to a boil for a few minutes. Season to taste, adding in around half the juice of the lemon. Serve sprinkled with the coriander leaves, alongside rice – I love it with brown basmati.

This has become such a staple in our house, it’s perfect for a Meatfree Monday meal, and is also great for lunches throughout the week. I can imagine it would be perfect if you’ve got a cold too, with the chilli and ginger being perfect for perking you up. Definitely one we’ll be making again and again throughout the year!

What’s your favourite vegan recipe?